Treat new skills as a gift, says music tutor

School kids transformed into a picture of musical harmony.

School kids transformed into a picture of musical harmony.

INTRODUCING THE MARCHING LIONS: Musician and teacher John Minogue created a band in two days with his Holiday Music Programme. Twelve children took part and had a great time learning about instruments and performance, including, from left, Taj Potter, Sienna Nepia, Luke Ogle behind John Minogue, Zara Potter, Jamie Daniels, Summer Tui Koia. Other kids attending but out of shot are Mikah and Anaya Blank (on keyboards), George Newlands (bass), Jaya Harris (drums) and on sound desk Jamie Ogle and Mimi Gilgren. Picture by Liam Clayton
GETTING THAT HOLIDAY BEAT GOING: Band members from Marching Lions include Luke Ogle, Taj Potter and Maioha Caddie-Koia. Picture by Liam Clayton

AFTER only two mornings in a school holiday music programme, a “motley bunch” of kids making lots of noise were transformed into a picture of musical harmony with everyone in the right spot.

That was the description by Tas Collier, who spoke at the lunchtime concert last week, the grand final to a music programme run by musician and teacher John Minogue.

About 12 young people joined up, some from Wainui School, some from up the coast and some home-schoolers.

They brought together a variety of instruments like bass, drums, guitar, keyboards and percussion. Everyone enjoyed the added confidence from performing together in a band on stage.

Mr Minogue said more than 30 mums, dads, aunties, uncles and friends gathered for the concert at the Assembly of God in Peel Street where the “Marching Lions” performed Wimoweh and When The Saints Go Marching In.

This is the second time Mr Minogue has run a school holiday music programme. The last one was in 2010.

The sessions teach the children about how the instruments work, how to care for them, then they find out where their strengths are for a part in the group.

Mr Collier, a musician himself, also spoke about what a gift music was.

“It is very spiritual, it can make people cry, make people laugh,” he said.

As a young person in the 1960s, Mr Collier said he would travel from Gisborne to Auckland just so he could go to the cafes there and watch the saxophone players. He would then drive back to Gisborne, practise all week on his, then make the journey up again the following weekend.

He complimented the children on their transformation after two days of fun and hard work, and encouraged them to enjoy their new-found skills.

“Treat it like a gift,” he told them.

AFTER only two mornings in a school holiday music programme, a “motley bunch” of kids making lots of noise were transformed into a picture of musical harmony with everyone in the right spot.

That was the description by Tas Collier, who spoke at the lunchtime concert last week, the grand final to a music programme run by musician and teacher John Minogue.

About 12 young people joined up, some from Wainui School, some from up the coast and some home-schoolers.

They brought together a variety of instruments like bass, drums, guitar, keyboards and percussion. Everyone enjoyed the added confidence from performing together in a band on stage.

Mr Minogue said more than 30 mums, dads, aunties, uncles and friends gathered for the concert at the Assembly of God in Peel Street where the “Marching Lions” performed Wimoweh and When The Saints Go Marching In.

This is the second time Mr Minogue has run a school holiday music programme. The last one was in 2010.

The sessions teach the children about how the instruments work, how to care for them, then they find out where their strengths are for a part in the group.

Mr Collier, a musician himself, also spoke about what a gift music was.

“It is very spiritual, it can make people cry, make people laugh,” he said.

As a young person in the 1960s, Mr Collier said he would travel from Gisborne to Auckland just so he could go to the cafes there and watch the saxophone players. He would then drive back to Gisborne, practise all week on his, then make the journey up again the following weekend.

He complimented the children on their transformation after two days of fun and hard work, and encouraged them to enjoy their new-found skills.

“Treat it like a gift,” he told them.

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Barbie Pauly, Shelly Park - 11 months ago
I just found this! :D God Bless Youfullas!