ECT grant to Bikes in Schools

More kids getting safely onto their bikes.

More kids getting safely onto their bikes.

RIDING HIGH: A $200,000 grant from the Eastland Community Trust has significantly boosted the Bikes in Schools project at regional level. Pictured here are Kaiti School students, who have piloted the program. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell

FOLLOWING a successful pilot scheme at Kaiti School, a regional programme to ensure all Gisborne school children know how to ride a bike has been given a $200,000 boost.

Eastland Community Trust yesterday announced it would become the latest organisation to help fund the Connext Charitable Trust’s $1 million Bikes in Schools project through a $200,000 grant from the trust’s Attractive Fund.

Connext Charitable Trust chairwoman Prue Younger said the organisation was grateful for the support and added that Bikes in Schools was already proving its worth.

“When we started our pilot programme in Kaiti School, 50 to 60 percent of children had never ridden a bike. But within four weeks of installing the track 92 percent of kids had learned to ride with confidence, with most using the track at least two or three times a week. Access to the track is now part of the school routine.”

The ECT grant will help Connext achieve its goal of benefiting 1700 children throughout the community.

It will also contribute to the funding of the full Bikes in Schools package for each school. This comprises the construction of tracks (including pump and skills tracks), new bikes, storage facilities and cycle skills training with an instructor who provides embedding skills to students and supports further teacher training.

ECT general manager Leighton Evans says the trust is pleased to be able to support the project.

“Since the pilot, it has become clear that this project has the potential to be a real game-changer,” he said.

“It’s expected to lead to positive health and social outcomes for students and whanau, it encourages students in to physical exercise and will expand our recreational profile, so it was a great match for our Attractive Fund.”

FOLLOWING a successful pilot scheme at Kaiti School, a regional programme to ensure all Gisborne school children know how to ride a bike has been given a $200,000 boost.

Eastland Community Trust yesterday announced it would become the latest organisation to help fund the Connext Charitable Trust’s $1 million Bikes in Schools project through a $200,000 grant from the trust’s Attractive Fund.

Connext Charitable Trust chairwoman Prue Younger said the organisation was grateful for the support and added that Bikes in Schools was already proving its worth.

“When we started our pilot programme in Kaiti School, 50 to 60 percent of children had never ridden a bike. But within four weeks of installing the track 92 percent of kids had learned to ride with confidence, with most using the track at least two or three times a week. Access to the track is now part of the school routine.”

The ECT grant will help Connext achieve its goal of benefiting 1700 children throughout the community.

It will also contribute to the funding of the full Bikes in Schools package for each school. This comprises the construction of tracks (including pump and skills tracks), new bikes, storage facilities and cycle skills training with an instructor who provides embedding skills to students and supports further teacher training.

ECT general manager Leighton Evans says the trust is pleased to be able to support the project.

“Since the pilot, it has become clear that this project has the potential to be a real game-changer,” he said.

“It’s expected to lead to positive health and social outcomes for students and whanau, it encourages students in to physical exercise and will expand our recreational profile, so it was a great match for our Attractive Fund.”

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winston moreton - 1 year ago
We are in the midst of the local body elections but your newspaper is not only headlining the wonderful things our electricity accounts are paying for; it also seems to be promoting the Eastland Community Trust which gives our money away to everybody and thing - except the poor old electricity account holder.
First, a magnificent multi-coloured advertorial lift out called "Come Join Us" along the lines of the infamous "Where the bloody hell are you?" - but who, outside Gisborne, is going to get a copy? Why is The Gisborne Herald promoting local attractions to local readers?
Then we have the front page story yesterday about ECT giving $400,000 for Uepohatu Marae and the Wharekura Rugby Ground followed today by $200,000 for Bikes in Schools. Sure they are worthy charities but what about the workers freezing their bums off and what about some more on why voters do not get around to returning their voting papers. Is postal voting a fail?

Footnote: Yes, we should have had a small story in Wednesday's paper explaining that 160,000 copies of the "Come Join Us" feature have been published - and that they will appear inside The Herald on Sunday this weekend and are also being inserted into Hawke's Bay Today, the Bay of Plenty Times, the Wairoa Star and the Whakatane Beacon. Ed