Defeated candidates put election loss behind them

"It's not how you get knocked down it's how you get up”

"It's not how you get knocked down it's how you get up”

Tony Robinson with partner Kaye Foreman. Pictures by Liam Clayton
Geoff Milner and his support team.

DEFEATED Mayoral candidates Tony Robinson and Geoff Milner were both ready to put their disappointment behind them on Saturday after the preliminary council election results were announced.

Tony Robinson said he and his wife Kaye would now go ahead with plans to circumnavigate the globe on a yacht while Mr Milner was enjoying some whanau time and proud of what he and his team had achieved.

Mr Robinson was second in the mayoral poll with 4663 votes and Mr Milner had 1340. The fourth candidate, Yvonne Bishop, had 226 votes.

Mr Robinson was the more surprised and disappointed of the two, saying he was more disappointed for the people of Gisborne. There had clearly been a message for change but that had not come to fruition.

“Really we need change,” he said.

“If Gisborne is going to grow and prosper and we are going to address social issues here and develop our full potential then we need change.

“It is really sad but democracy is what it is and people get what they pay for.”

Transparency and accountability

The major issues of the campaign had been transparency and accountability for the council.

“I am surprised. There really was a serious vibe in the community. I am really proud of our campaign. At the end of the day we have put some key issues on the table there can be no denying that.

“I think (chief executive) Judy Campbell became the sacrificial lamb last week so that maybe some councillors could try to recover some credibility with the community but at the end of the day we know who made the decisions.

“Time will tell and the chickens will come home to roost.I really am concerned about the financial future of Tairawhiti-Gisborne. It is not doable. The ten-year plan has rates increasing to 3.5 percent. I think we ran a clean campaign and I am hoping the voting turn out will end up slightly higher than last time. I would dearly love us to get above 50 percent. People talk about Maori wards, how about we just actively encourage participation in democracy.

“We have got to start with the council being open and transparent.

He and his wife Kay put their plan A on hold for the election and were now free to cruise and complete a circumnavigation of the globe.

Mr Milner, relaxing with friends and family at a local restaurant on Saturday was more philosophical.

"We said last night in the Gisborne Herald that the voting public are never wrong and we honour the decision of the voters,” he said.

“We're are here today celebrating what has been a ten-month journey and taking in the results."

One reason that he stood was that his deceased father-in-law had encouraged him to do so because he believed Gisborne needed a mayor who characterised the city so they had honoured that.

“It has been a huge learning journey having never stood for public office and we have learned a lot.

He acknowledged those who had been successful and sent a text to Meng Foon and the two new Gisborne ward members.

“We have learned a lot and we think it has been worth every hour, every cent.”

This afternoon was about whanau time and he had no plans for the future at present.

“But I am a great believer in sport that if at first you don't succeed, try and try again. It's not how you get knocked down it is how you get up,” he said.

DEFEATED Mayoral candidates Tony Robinson and Geoff Milner were both ready to put their disappointment behind them on Saturday after the preliminary council election results were announced.

Tony Robinson said he and his wife Kaye would now go ahead with plans to circumnavigate the globe on a yacht while Mr Milner was enjoying some whanau time and proud of what he and his team had achieved.

Mr Robinson was second in the mayoral poll with 4663 votes and Mr Milner had 1340. The fourth candidate, Yvonne Bishop, had 226 votes.

Mr Robinson was the more surprised and disappointed of the two, saying he was more disappointed for the people of Gisborne. There had clearly been a message for change but that had not come to fruition.

“Really we need change,” he said.

“If Gisborne is going to grow and prosper and we are going to address social issues here and develop our full potential then we need change.

“It is really sad but democracy is what it is and people get what they pay for.”

Transparency and accountability

The major issues of the campaign had been transparency and accountability for the council.

“I am surprised. There really was a serious vibe in the community. I am really proud of our campaign. At the end of the day we have put some key issues on the table there can be no denying that.

“I think (chief executive) Judy Campbell became the sacrificial lamb last week so that maybe some councillors could try to recover some credibility with the community but at the end of the day we know who made the decisions.

“Time will tell and the chickens will come home to roost.I really am concerned about the financial future of Tairawhiti-Gisborne. It is not doable. The ten-year plan has rates increasing to 3.5 percent. I think we ran a clean campaign and I am hoping the voting turn out will end up slightly higher than last time. I would dearly love us to get above 50 percent. People talk about Maori wards, how about we just actively encourage participation in democracy.

“We have got to start with the council being open and transparent.

He and his wife Kay put their plan A on hold for the election and were now free to cruise and complete a circumnavigation of the globe.

Mr Milner, relaxing with friends and family at a local restaurant on Saturday was more philosophical.

"We said last night in the Gisborne Herald that the voting public are never wrong and we honour the decision of the voters,” he said.

“We're are here today celebrating what has been a ten-month journey and taking in the results."

One reason that he stood was that his deceased father-in-law had encouraged him to do so because he believed Gisborne needed a mayor who characterised the city so they had honoured that.

“It has been a huge learning journey having never stood for public office and we have learned a lot.

He acknowledged those who had been successful and sent a text to Meng Foon and the two new Gisborne ward members.

“We have learned a lot and we think it has been worth every hour, every cent.”

This afternoon was about whanau time and he had no plans for the future at present.

“But I am a great believer in sport that if at first you don't succeed, try and try again. It's not how you get knocked down it is how you get up,” he said.

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