'Special status' iwi seeks direct dialogue on water

Iwi says Treaty partner status should be recognised.

Iwi says Treaty partner status should be recognised.

AT yesterday’s hearing on the draft district freshwater plan iwi trustee Jody Wyllie made a plea for Gisborne District Council to dialogue directly with Rongowhakaata.

Mr Wyllie was speaking with fellow presenters Te Rina Whaanga and Murray Palmer, and said Rongowhakaata’s status as a Treaty partner should be recognised at the hearing.

They were not like other submitters at the hearing, they had special status and were partners with the Government.

He did not see why they had to jump through hoops and line up with LeaderBrand and other submitters.

He told deputy mayor Rehette Stoltz, who was sitting as a commissioner, they had had issues with the council for a number of years.

He hoped that as deputy mayor she would spend some time with the new council improving this relationship.

“The only way for us to move forward, I believe, is for us to sit down and have some dialogue. We have never had it in the past.”

He was getting sick of playing a scratched record on this issue.

Was the city going to rely on the dams at Waingake for the rest of their lives? What would happen if there were a major earthquake?

In memory of 24 chiefs who signed the Treaty of Waitangi at Manutuke in 1840, he appealed to the council to start dialogue with Rongowhakaata.

Commissioner will take it on board

Mrs Stoltz said her role at this hearing was as a commissioner but she would take on board what Mr Wyllie had said.

Among issues raised by the Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust were priorities for the use of the Gisborne municipal supply for industrial purposes, over-allocation of water permits and the need for a mechanism for water allocation on the basis of cultural activity through a kaitiaki flow allocation system.

The iwi wanted the council to amend the freshwater policy so that urban industrial takes were subject to the same restrictions as rural ones. Priority ranking should be established based on particular industries and their importance to the region’s socio-economic framework and community wellbeing.

Rongowhakaata requested that the taking and use of water for the Gisborne municipal water supply from the Te Arai bush intake should continue as a priority use without a minimum flow until 2026 when a minimum flow should be set.

It wanted the council and mana whenua to establish a flow monitoring point above and below the bush intake to monitor the fisheries and cultural flows of the river from 2017 to 2026, to establish an ecologically-appropriate minimum flow.

It opposed the recommendation to remove references to intensively-farmed stock from the plan.

The trust believed there was a need to consider mechanisms that addressed equitable allocation of water.

It reaffirmed the need to ensure sufficient water was reserved for tangata whenua use.

For fully-allocated or over-allocated water bodies tangata whenua should define a suitable interim water allocation.

Tangata whenua should have a priority place on the list of waiting requests for water allocation.

Permit durations should be limited to five years with no exemption criteria for applicants who could demonstrate a history of achieving reasonable and efficient use.

AT yesterday’s hearing on the draft district freshwater plan iwi trustee Jody Wyllie made a plea for Gisborne District Council to dialogue directly with Rongowhakaata.

Mr Wyllie was speaking with fellow presenters Te Rina Whaanga and Murray Palmer, and said Rongowhakaata’s status as a Treaty partner should be recognised at the hearing.

They were not like other submitters at the hearing, they had special status and were partners with the Government.

He did not see why they had to jump through hoops and line up with LeaderBrand and other submitters.

He told deputy mayor Rehette Stoltz, who was sitting as a commissioner, they had had issues with the council for a number of years.

He hoped that as deputy mayor she would spend some time with the new council improving this relationship.

“The only way for us to move forward, I believe, is for us to sit down and have some dialogue. We have never had it in the past.”

He was getting sick of playing a scratched record on this issue.

Was the city going to rely on the dams at Waingake for the rest of their lives? What would happen if there were a major earthquake?

In memory of 24 chiefs who signed the Treaty of Waitangi at Manutuke in 1840, he appealed to the council to start dialogue with Rongowhakaata.

Commissioner will take it on board

Mrs Stoltz said her role at this hearing was as a commissioner but she would take on board what Mr Wyllie had said.

Among issues raised by the Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust were priorities for the use of the Gisborne municipal supply for industrial purposes, over-allocation of water permits and the need for a mechanism for water allocation on the basis of cultural activity through a kaitiaki flow allocation system.

The iwi wanted the council to amend the freshwater policy so that urban industrial takes were subject to the same restrictions as rural ones. Priority ranking should be established based on particular industries and their importance to the region’s socio-economic framework and community wellbeing.

Rongowhakaata requested that the taking and use of water for the Gisborne municipal water supply from the Te Arai bush intake should continue as a priority use without a minimum flow until 2026 when a minimum flow should be set.

It wanted the council and mana whenua to establish a flow monitoring point above and below the bush intake to monitor the fisheries and cultural flows of the river from 2017 to 2026, to establish an ecologically-appropriate minimum flow.

It opposed the recommendation to remove references to intensively-farmed stock from the plan.

The trust believed there was a need to consider mechanisms that addressed equitable allocation of water.

It reaffirmed the need to ensure sufficient water was reserved for tangata whenua use.

For fully-allocated or over-allocated water bodies tangata whenua should define a suitable interim water allocation.

Tangata whenua should have a priority place on the list of waiting requests for water allocation.

Permit durations should be limited to five years with no exemption criteria for applicants who could demonstrate a history of achieving reasonable and efficient use.

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