Ten submissions for aquifer trial hearing

Hearing on Monday

Hearing on Monday

THE case for Gisborne District Council’s controversial Makauri marine aquifer recharge trial will be put to a hearing of independent commissioners on Monday. The council is seeking resource consents to drill up to three bores, take surface water from the Waipaoa River and discharge water to land and water to water via injection.

The Bay of Plenty Regional council has been delegated to process the application on behalf of the council. It will be heard by three independent commissioners, Mark St Clair (chairman), Peter Callander and Antoine Coffin. The council proposes to drill an injection bore to a depth of 87 metres.

It wants to undertake a 72 hour constant rate abstraction test and proposes to inject 10,000 cubic metres of water from the river into the injection bore. The average rate of injection would be 10 to 15 litres per second with a maximum rate of 22 l/sec. A total volume of 100,000 cubic metres of water would be taken from the river for the trial at a rate of 10 to 15 litres/sec.

The proposed duration of the trial is approximately 100 days. The officer’s report from the Bay of Plenty Regional Council recommends that the resource consent be granted. Ten submissions have been received on the application. Nine of these including submissions from Horticulture NZ, LeaderBrand, Mangatu Blocks and the Wi Pere Trust support the application.

Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust has made a submission opposing the application. The trust says there is a need to obtain more information to enable decision- making and seeks active involvement in monitoring and management.

It also raises cultural issues on the potential of the trial to change the mauri of water and dissatisfaction with the cultural impact assessment provided by the applicant. The trust says the proposal does not meet the requirements of the Resource Management Act.

After the applicant’s opening on Monday, the commissioners will make a site inspection.

The proposed aquifer recharge trial became an issue with doubts being raised about it by Gisborne lawyer and mayoral candidate Tony Robinson, who said more information was needed. The trial has been strongly supported by horticulturists including LeaderBrand who warned the council that some crops had already been taken out of the district because of the lack of water for irrigation.

The council has been told that the aquifer is declining.

THE case for Gisborne District Council’s controversial Makauri marine aquifer recharge trial will be put to a hearing of independent commissioners on Monday. The council is seeking resource consents to drill up to three bores, take surface water from the Waipaoa River and discharge water to land and water to water via injection.

The Bay of Plenty Regional council has been delegated to process the application on behalf of the council. It will be heard by three independent commissioners, Mark St Clair (chairman), Peter Callander and Antoine Coffin. The council proposes to drill an injection bore to a depth of 87 metres.

It wants to undertake a 72 hour constant rate abstraction test and proposes to inject 10,000 cubic metres of water from the river into the injection bore. The average rate of injection would be 10 to 15 litres per second with a maximum rate of 22 l/sec. A total volume of 100,000 cubic metres of water would be taken from the river for the trial at a rate of 10 to 15 litres/sec.

The proposed duration of the trial is approximately 100 days. The officer’s report from the Bay of Plenty Regional Council recommends that the resource consent be granted. Ten submissions have been received on the application. Nine of these including submissions from Horticulture NZ, LeaderBrand, Mangatu Blocks and the Wi Pere Trust support the application.

Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust has made a submission opposing the application. The trust says there is a need to obtain more information to enable decision- making and seeks active involvement in monitoring and management.

It also raises cultural issues on the potential of the trial to change the mauri of water and dissatisfaction with the cultural impact assessment provided by the applicant. The trust says the proposal does not meet the requirements of the Resource Management Act.

After the applicant’s opening on Monday, the commissioners will make a site inspection.

The proposed aquifer recharge trial became an issue with doubts being raised about it by Gisborne lawyer and mayoral candidate Tony Robinson, who said more information was needed. The trial has been strongly supported by horticulturists including LeaderBrand who warned the council that some crops had already been taken out of the district because of the lack of water for irrigation.

The council has been told that the aquifer is declining.

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