Digital installation wins design award

Design responds to New Zealand’s indigenous culture, heritage and sense of place.

Design responds to New Zealand’s indigenous culture, heritage and sense of place.

BEST DESIGN WINS: Gisborne woman Harmony Repia and co-designer Lachie Philipson won gold and bronze medals at the Best Design Awards for their interactive digital installation Kauhanga. Picture supplied

AN INTERACTIVE digital installation that uses skeletal tracking to create a visual spectacle has landed Gisborne woman Harmony Repia and co-designer Lachie Philipson gold and bronze medals at the Best Design Awards.

“We’re pretty stoked,” Ms Repia said.

The duo won gold for their Kauhanga project in the nga aho student category. The nga aho category focuses on design that responds to New Zealand’s indigenous culture, heritage and sense of place.

Ms Repia and Mr Philipson also won bronze in the spatial category which focuses on environments such as exhibition and temporary structures, interiors and workplaces.

Kauhanga means “sacred passageway” and is presented as a live, interactive, digital experience at Auckland’s Aotea Centre. Ms Repia focussed on the concept, theme and imagery for the project while Mr Philipson worked on installation’s technology, part of which uses infrared light to locate the viewer’s joints and track his or her movements. Software creates matching but fluid forms from galaxies of particles which are projected onto a wall.

Ms Repia completed her communication design course at Wellington’s Massey University College of Creative Arts last year and is due to graduate this year.

Her day job is as a service designer for the Ministry for Primary Industries where she is working on the Food Act 2014, which came into force in March. The act takes a new approach to managing food safety.

“My time there has been about working with the food and beverage team to help create resources,” she said.

Resources include video, animations and form design for guidance documents.

“We try to make it simple for the public to understand. Food businesses need to meet the act.”

AN INTERACTIVE digital installation that uses skeletal tracking to create a visual spectacle has landed Gisborne woman Harmony Repia and co-designer Lachie Philipson gold and bronze medals at the Best Design Awards.

“We’re pretty stoked,” Ms Repia said.

The duo won gold for their Kauhanga project in the nga aho student category. The nga aho category focuses on design that responds to New Zealand’s indigenous culture, heritage and sense of place.

Ms Repia and Mr Philipson also won bronze in the spatial category which focuses on environments such as exhibition and temporary structures, interiors and workplaces.

Kauhanga means “sacred passageway” and is presented as a live, interactive, digital experience at Auckland’s Aotea Centre. Ms Repia focussed on the concept, theme and imagery for the project while Mr Philipson worked on installation’s technology, part of which uses infrared light to locate the viewer’s joints and track his or her movements. Software creates matching but fluid forms from galaxies of particles which are projected onto a wall.

Ms Repia completed her communication design course at Wellington’s Massey University College of Creative Arts last year and is due to graduate this year.

Her day job is as a service designer for the Ministry for Primary Industries where she is working on the Food Act 2014, which came into force in March. The act takes a new approach to managing food safety.

“My time there has been about working with the food and beverage team to help create resources,” she said.

Resources include video, animations and form design for guidance documents.

“We try to make it simple for the public to understand. Food businesses need to meet the act.”

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