Mayor wants name change

Plans to invite iwi to add original name to 'Poverty Bay'.

Plans to invite iwi to add original name to 'Poverty Bay'.

The Mayor is seeking a name to add to Poverty Bay.

THE Mayor will invite iwi to suggest a name to add to the name Poverty Bay.

Meng Foon said at yesterday’s swearing-in ceremony for the 10th Gisborne District Council that he has had a number of letters on the subject.

“It is time to add the original name to Poverty Bay,” he said.

He likened it to Mount Egmont-Mount Taranaki and Mount Cook-Aoraki where both stories were celebrated and told.

He wanted to know what name iwi thought should be associated with Poverty Bay, and he had in mind what the name should be but iwi would be asked to suggest a correct name.

Poverty Bay was the name Captain James Cook gave to the bay in 1769. Mr Foon said he actually wrote down Endeavour as the name but, as he left, scribbled it out and replaced it with Poverty Bay.

“I know the community will have a wonderful debate about that,” Mr Foon said.

Other council matters

The new council was committed to serving the district to the best of its ability, he said.

The percentage of those who voted at the election, 48 percent, was similar to last time and one of the highest in the country but not high enough, he said.

It was up to people whether they voted or not. The council’s door would be open to everybody.

An informal meeting of the new council had already left him enthused at the openness, friendliness and the desire to make “our place” a great place.

The council would work hard to ensure that the core infrastructure was functioning well.

There also had to be social infrastructure such as playing fields, libraries, museums, and arts and
culture.

He acknowledged the many NGOs (non-government organisations) doing fantastic work on behalf of the community, and the social fabric of the community was exemplary, he said.

Mr Foon said environmental matters were important and he hoped that the panel hearing the submissions on the regional freshwater plan would make sensible and practical decisions. The council hoped to progress the Waipaoa River Flood Control scheme during this term.

They were waiting for the announcement in two months of the Government’s regional development investment plan and hoped the Government would support the council.

“For us our main need is roading,” he said. As industries invested more in the development of the district, more vehicles were using the roads.

The Government should note the contribution this district made to the country’s GDP and the employment opportunities needed. Roads and bridges were key.

Te Ha

The Te Ha commemorations in 2019 would be a great opportunity to celebrate and to showcase to the world what a wonderful place Gisborne-Tairawhiti was in the conception of the nation.

It was a time to celebrate this wonderful paradise that “we call home”.

“Home will always be home to us. Our whakapapa is entrenched in the soil, in the lineage of each and every one of us. We all have stories to tell."

He acknowledged the contribution of the chief executive and her staff to the many projects coming on line, like the library, and staff coming together in one building.

Rocket Lab at Mahia created opportunities for Gisborne as the closest town that could service the business effectively.

The development of Titirangi (Kaiti Hill) was paramount to storytelling but would give a direct view of the firing of rockets.

The iwi relationship was important to the council and it would continue to be committed to that. Their hopes and aspirations were important to the wellbeing of the district. The council wanted to support them as much as possible.

Rehette Stoltz was re-elected deputy mayor.

THE Mayor will invite iwi to suggest a name to add to the name Poverty Bay.

Meng Foon said at yesterday’s swearing-in ceremony for the 10th Gisborne District Council that he has had a number of letters on the subject.

“It is time to add the original name to Poverty Bay,” he said.

He likened it to Mount Egmont-Mount Taranaki and Mount Cook-Aoraki where both stories were celebrated and told.

He wanted to know what name iwi thought should be associated with Poverty Bay, and he had in mind what the name should be but iwi would be asked to suggest a correct name.

Poverty Bay was the name Captain James Cook gave to the bay in 1769. Mr Foon said he actually wrote down Endeavour as the name but, as he left, scribbled it out and replaced it with Poverty Bay.

“I know the community will have a wonderful debate about that,” Mr Foon said.

Other council matters

The new council was committed to serving the district to the best of its ability, he said.

The percentage of those who voted at the election, 48 percent, was similar to last time and one of the highest in the country but not high enough, he said.

It was up to people whether they voted or not. The council’s door would be open to everybody.

An informal meeting of the new council had already left him enthused at the openness, friendliness and the desire to make “our place” a great place.

The council would work hard to ensure that the core infrastructure was functioning well.

There also had to be social infrastructure such as playing fields, libraries, museums, and arts and
culture.

He acknowledged the many NGOs (non-government organisations) doing fantastic work on behalf of the community, and the social fabric of the community was exemplary, he said.

Mr Foon said environmental matters were important and he hoped that the panel hearing the submissions on the regional freshwater plan would make sensible and practical decisions. The council hoped to progress the Waipaoa River Flood Control scheme during this term.

They were waiting for the announcement in two months of the Government’s regional development investment plan and hoped the Government would support the council.

“For us our main need is roading,” he said. As industries invested more in the development of the district, more vehicles were using the roads.

The Government should note the contribution this district made to the country’s GDP and the employment opportunities needed. Roads and bridges were key.

Te Ha

The Te Ha commemorations in 2019 would be a great opportunity to celebrate and to showcase to the world what a wonderful place Gisborne-Tairawhiti was in the conception of the nation.

It was a time to celebrate this wonderful paradise that “we call home”.

“Home will always be home to us. Our whakapapa is entrenched in the soil, in the lineage of each and every one of us. We all have stories to tell."

He acknowledged the contribution of the chief executive and her staff to the many projects coming on line, like the library, and staff coming together in one building.

Rocket Lab at Mahia created opportunities for Gisborne as the closest town that could service the business effectively.

The development of Titirangi (Kaiti Hill) was paramount to storytelling but would give a direct view of the firing of rockets.

The iwi relationship was important to the council and it would continue to be committed to that. Their hopes and aspirations were important to the wellbeing of the district. The council wanted to support them as much as possible.

Rehette Stoltz was re-elected deputy mayor.

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ross bodle - 1 year ago
My dad wanted the name changed when he was the public relations officer in Gisborne back around the 1960s, as Poverty Bay, to some, meant just that. Today we all know poverty should be removed to be replaced with something meaning a successful district, something in Maori such as Turanganui a Kiwa . . . or perhaps 'Gisborne The Golden'.

Thelma E Karaitiana - 1 year ago
Invitation to suggest a name to add to the name Poverty Bay.
Anyone can propose a new name or alter an existing name for a place or feature to the New Zealand Geographic Board (NZGB) who assigns new names, alters or discontinues current ones, approves and adopts recorded names, and concurs with and validates Crown protected area names. The board uses a number of criteria to make a decision on any proposal. The board encourages consultation with local communities, local iwi, local councils or any interested person to help it make informed decisions on naming proposals, that will endure. According to the New Zealand Gazetteer, a publication maintained by the board, Poverty Bay while it is recorded, it is not an official name, nor does the feature called Poverty Bay have an official name. The same applies to the name and feature called Gisborne.
From his Annual Report 2015/16, the chairman, Mark Dyer states, the New Zealand Geographic Board has a responsibility to safeguard the place naming traditions, culture and heritage brought to New Zealand by its various communities. Knowing the stories behind place names adds to our sense of identity and belonging - helping us better connect with our identity: who we are, where we're from, and the importance of those who came before us. For this reason, the board's contribution to place names in the cultural redress of Treaty of Waitangi settlements continues to be an important priority. This includes the ongoing commitment to post-settlement relationships. For the benefit of any interested persons the criteria for proposing a name changes is as follows;
1. Proposal is received by the NZGB
2. Research and report by the Secretariat
3. Board considers proposal
4. Proposal publicly notified, seeking submissions
5. Board considers submissions
6. Board or Minister make final decision
7. Official place name gazetted
8. Gazetter updated
Through recent Treaty of Waitangi claims activity the local iwi have become familiar with the criteria of name change. As a member of the Rongowhakaata iwi, we may well issue a cordial invitation to the Mayor and the District Council to suggest a name to add to Turanganui a Kiwa.

P.S.
Te Ha.
In regard to Cook's landing in Turanganui a Kiwa, we note that between the years 1768 to 1771 there was no "Nicholas Young" listed among the crew, the marines nor the citizens aboard the Bark Endeavour. Joseph Banks recalls "a small boy" and it was recorded that the ships surgeon had a servant named Thomas Jones, however there was no record of a Nicholas Young. Do we have another misnomer in our estate of statues and dare we mention the name; Young Nicks Head.

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