Weather causes disruption to our seasonal crops

Some crop planters 10 days behind usual timetable.

Some crop planters 10 days behind usual timetable.

DELAYED: A disruptive weather pattern in the past month has caused delays to crop planting in the district. File picture

THE weather pattern has disrupted the annual crop planting season in the region, with sweetcorn and squash a week to 10 days behind the usual schedule and maize up to three weeks behind.

Growers hope for a decent summer weather-wise to help their crops catch up.

“We have about 40 percent of our sweetcorn planted at this stage and normally we have a lot more than that in the ground by now,” said Cedenco agronomy manager David Oudes.

“It is due to the generally disruptive weather pattern over the past month,which has made planting difficult.

“If the weather is kind from here on in we should have it all planted by around Christmas, which would be about a week to 10 days later than normal.”

Mr Oudes said the weather was not something croppers could do much about.

“If you plant later then you harvest later — it’s as simple as that.

“It is what it is but we are certainly later with our sweetcorn planting than what we would like.”

Cedenco is about halfway through the tomato planting programme.

“That has also been delayed by the weather,” Mr Oudes said.

LeaderBrand’s squash and sweetcorn crops have likewise run about a week to 10 days behind because of the weather.

“What is quite interesting is that everything that has been planted, in what has been a long period of wet weather, has taken well,” said company farm production manager Gordon McPhail.

“The issue is that wetter paddocks make it harder to prepare the soil and plant.

“But when we have been able to do it, the continual smaller amounts of rain have meant the crops have flourished in their early stages.

“So there is a positive note to it all and we still hope to have squash harvested by Christmas as usual.”

The maize-planting programme around the region has been delayed as well and Glencore Grain, for example, are three weeks behind schedule.

Warm weather ahead

“It has been one of the harder planting seasons I have seen,” said regional manager David Corrin.

“We will still get all the crop in.

“But we are hoping for a decent warm summer to help the crops catch up and then an Indian summer into autumn to help finish them off.”

n Cedenco will start to harvest the pea crop this week.

“It is a bit early to tell exactly how good the crop will be but it looks reasonable,” Mr Oudes said.

The company expects to harvest about 2000-plus tonnes of peas this year with crops planted on the Poverty Bay Flats, in the Wairoa district and at Tolaga Bay.

The harvest will take about three to four weeks.

THE weather pattern has disrupted the annual crop planting season in the region, with sweetcorn and squash a week to 10 days behind the usual schedule and maize up to three weeks behind.

Growers hope for a decent summer weather-wise to help their crops catch up.

“We have about 40 percent of our sweetcorn planted at this stage and normally we have a lot more than that in the ground by now,” said Cedenco agronomy manager David Oudes.

“It is due to the generally disruptive weather pattern over the past month,which has made planting difficult.

“If the weather is kind from here on in we should have it all planted by around Christmas, which would be about a week to 10 days later than normal.”

Mr Oudes said the weather was not something croppers could do much about.

“If you plant later then you harvest later — it’s as simple as that.

“It is what it is but we are certainly later with our sweetcorn planting than what we would like.”

Cedenco is about halfway through the tomato planting programme.

“That has also been delayed by the weather,” Mr Oudes said.

LeaderBrand’s squash and sweetcorn crops have likewise run about a week to 10 days behind because of the weather.

“What is quite interesting is that everything that has been planted, in what has been a long period of wet weather, has taken well,” said company farm production manager Gordon McPhail.

“The issue is that wetter paddocks make it harder to prepare the soil and plant.

“But when we have been able to do it, the continual smaller amounts of rain have meant the crops have flourished in their early stages.

“So there is a positive note to it all and we still hope to have squash harvested by Christmas as usual.”

The maize-planting programme around the region has been delayed as well and Glencore Grain, for example, are three weeks behind schedule.

Warm weather ahead

“It has been one of the harder planting seasons I have seen,” said regional manager David Corrin.

“We will still get all the crop in.

“But we are hoping for a decent warm summer to help the crops catch up and then an Indian summer into autumn to help finish them off.”

n Cedenco will start to harvest the pea crop this week.

“It is a bit early to tell exactly how good the crop will be but it looks reasonable,” Mr Oudes said.

The company expects to harvest about 2000-plus tonnes of peas this year with crops planted on the Poverty Bay Flats, in the Wairoa district and at Tolaga Bay.

The harvest will take about three to four weeks.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Should consultation on Gisborne city wastewater treatment and disposal include a “do nothing” option as suggested by the Mayor on Thursday, as well as the five options priced at estimated capital costs of $23.5 million to $42.1m which were approved by councillors?