Mayor speaks up for White Ribbon

Stand up, speak out and act to prevent men’s violence towards women

Stand up, speak out and act to prevent men’s violence towards women

Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon will stand up, speak out and act to prevent men’s violence towards women.

“This is the pledge I take for White Ribbon day — not just November but every day,” says Mr Foon on the eve of White Ribbon week, which runs from Monday and ends with White Ribbon day on Friday.

A lot of hard work had gone into this programme over the past 10 years in Tairawhiti, he said.

“I acknowledge all those who have been at the coalface of all this work. It is not easy. It is only right that we debate and talk about this topic in the public arena. The police are doing what they can and the current resources are not enough,” he said.

“We have participated in marches against drug abuse, sexual abuse, women abuse and all sorts to highlight the fact that this type of behaviour needs to stop and there are many organisations in our community that are here to help — you only need to reach out.”

The problem of 'P'

Mr Foon said the problem of the drug “P”concerned him a lot.

“Many people have spoken to me about how we can stop this. One way is at the border, in our customs controlled areas, but a lot is landing on our beaches as well, as we saw on 90 Mile Beach.”

After a successful raid for the drug, Gisborne Police gave people on P supportive counselling.

“Denis O’Reilly recently held a forum here in Te Araroa. He said that this zombie drug is the worst, and people go nuts and do crazy things like smashing their heads through windscreens.”

At the recent poverty seminar in Gisborne, it was said we needed more drug rehabilitation services here, said Mr Foon.

Far North Mayor John Carter and Mr Foon went to Parliament to meet with deputy PM Bill English to talk about drugs and poverty.

“What he wanted was solutions from us in these areas.”

Community leadership

He knew Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou had a successful programme to support foster children within their own rohe.

“Programmes like this go a long way to guide our young people into positive community members. Regardless of all the adversity we all face, we must continue to speak out and continue our leadership role to help where we can,” Mr Foon said.

Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon will stand up, speak out and act to prevent men’s violence towards women.

“This is the pledge I take for White Ribbon day — not just November but every day,” says Mr Foon on the eve of White Ribbon week, which runs from Monday and ends with White Ribbon day on Friday.

A lot of hard work had gone into this programme over the past 10 years in Tairawhiti, he said.

“I acknowledge all those who have been at the coalface of all this work. It is not easy. It is only right that we debate and talk about this topic in the public arena. The police are doing what they can and the current resources are not enough,” he said.

“We have participated in marches against drug abuse, sexual abuse, women abuse and all sorts to highlight the fact that this type of behaviour needs to stop and there are many organisations in our community that are here to help — you only need to reach out.”

The problem of 'P'

Mr Foon said the problem of the drug “P”concerned him a lot.

“Many people have spoken to me about how we can stop this. One way is at the border, in our customs controlled areas, but a lot is landing on our beaches as well, as we saw on 90 Mile Beach.”

After a successful raid for the drug, Gisborne Police gave people on P supportive counselling.

“Denis O’Reilly recently held a forum here in Te Araroa. He said that this zombie drug is the worst, and people go nuts and do crazy things like smashing their heads through windscreens.”

At the recent poverty seminar in Gisborne, it was said we needed more drug rehabilitation services here, said Mr Foon.

Far North Mayor John Carter and Mr Foon went to Parliament to meet with deputy PM Bill English to talk about drugs and poverty.

“What he wanted was solutions from us in these areas.”

Community leadership

He knew Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou had a successful programme to support foster children within their own rohe.

“Programmes like this go a long way to guide our young people into positive community members. Regardless of all the adversity we all face, we must continue to speak out and continue our leadership role to help where we can,” Mr Foon said.

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