New rules in pest management plan

Authorities would be required to do weed and pest control. Plan in consultation period for three months

Authorities would be required to do weed and pest control. Plan in consultation period for three months

Possums: Cute, but a pest.

A proposed regional pest management plan will include significant changes, Gisborne District Council’s environmental planning and regulations committee was told.

Shared science manager Lois Easton said changes in approach included requiring authorities to comply with the plan and undertake weed and animal pest control in accordance with the plan rules. It included good neighbour rules that would also bind the Crown, requiring activity such as boundary weed clearance and animal pest control.

Eradication of pests feasible

New plant and animal pests that had emerged and become a threat to the environmental, economic, social and cultural values of the district would be included in the plan. The plan would use site-led programmes for some widespread weeds and pests affecting the biodiversity and amenity-cultural values of the district. The council would undertake service delivery where eradication of pests was feasible.

It included the development of an active exclusion programme with a surveillance and immediate response for new pest arrivals. Following consultation, district-wide possum control would continue as part of a service delivery role with the council, with a 10 percent residual trap catch in a buffer area with Hawke's Bay.

Rating contributions for plan

A possible split of rating contributions was included in the plan. The plant and animal pest component would be funded 60 percent from the rural community and 40 percent from general rates. The environmental and amenity plant and animal pest component would be funded 100 percent from the general rate. If they were adopted, these alterations would have to be included in the 2018-28 annual plan.

The proposed plan represented a significant shift in how the council regulated for and managed biosecurity in the district, the committee was told. While the feedback on consultation to date indicated there was strong support for the proposed approach, the changes would have some detractors.

The committee approved the plan to be released for a three-month consultation period.

A proposed regional pest management plan will include significant changes, Gisborne District Council’s environmental planning and regulations committee was told.

Shared science manager Lois Easton said changes in approach included requiring authorities to comply with the plan and undertake weed and animal pest control in accordance with the plan rules. It included good neighbour rules that would also bind the Crown, requiring activity such as boundary weed clearance and animal pest control.

Eradication of pests feasible

New plant and animal pests that had emerged and become a threat to the environmental, economic, social and cultural values of the district would be included in the plan. The plan would use site-led programmes for some widespread weeds and pests affecting the biodiversity and amenity-cultural values of the district. The council would undertake service delivery where eradication of pests was feasible.

It included the development of an active exclusion programme with a surveillance and immediate response for new pest arrivals. Following consultation, district-wide possum control would continue as part of a service delivery role with the council, with a 10 percent residual trap catch in a buffer area with Hawke's Bay.

Rating contributions for plan

A possible split of rating contributions was included in the plan. The plant and animal pest component would be funded 60 percent from the rural community and 40 percent from general rates. The environmental and amenity plant and animal pest component would be funded 100 percent from the general rate. If they were adopted, these alterations would have to be included in the 2018-28 annual plan.

The proposed plan represented a significant shift in how the council regulated for and managed biosecurity in the district, the committee was told. While the feedback on consultation to date indicated there was strong support for the proposed approach, the changes would have some detractors.

The committee approved the plan to be released for a three-month consultation period.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the recent pay equity deal for aged care and disability support staff?