Residents lumbered with rubbish after Rhythm and Vines

'Mostly they were good kids, but all it takes is one bad egg.'

'Mostly they were good kids, but all it takes is one bad egg.'

Festival-goers at Rhythm and Vines. Residents have praised the festival but are dismayed at the amount of rubbish they have been left with. Picture by Liam Clayton

TIGHTER alcohol licensing restrictions on Rhythm and Vines has resulted in more rubbish dumped in areas around the festival site, leaving nearby residents having to clean it up.

Each night of the festival, resident Aubrey Ria on Back Ormond Road witnessed festival-goers pull up on the side of their road and down side roads — away from the liquor ban area — to pre-drink before heading to the festival.

Before heading on they would clear their cars out of bottles, cans, beer boxes — even some full of alcohol.

“The amount of rubbish this year is ridiculous, way more than other years,” Ms Ria said.

“We have been collecting it outside our home, and others have been collecting it up and down the roads. There is still loads there now.”

She believes people dumped their rubbish to remove evidence of drinking, so as not to break the new alcohol restrictions for Rhythm and Vines.

All cars were searched for alcohol before entering the festival carpark at Waiohika Estate vineyard, near Gray’s Bush.

Any alcohol found was confiscated and destroyed, and festival-goers could be issued a “yellow card” warning, which would be attached to the entry wristbands to restrict them from buying more alcohol.

A “red card” would be issued and the person removed from the event for a subsequent breach.

The measures were put in place to address police concerns over the amount of drinking in the carpark at last year’s event.

These measures added to a temporary liquor ban during Rhythm and Vines in the Gray’s Bush reserve and car park, Waimata Valley Road including the lookout, Back Ormond Road from Glenelg Road to Waihirere Domain Road, and Harper Road to Tucker Road.

Going outside the ban areas

Ms Ria said festival-goers simply went outside the liquor ban areas to drink.

“I have enjoyed Rhythm and Vines and it is a great experience, but we used to be able to take drinks into the carpark.

“Lots of kids come from out of town, come here to drink and party, but have nowhere to go.”

She saw girls urinating at the bus stop at the corner to Waihirere Domain.

“There needs to be designated drinking areas so they don’t resort to the side of the road.”

There should at least be rubbish bins in the area and even toilets, she said.

Waihirere resident Tangiwai Ria had a similar experience.

“All around our area there were cars parked along the road, biffing rubbish and bottles into the paddock.

“We had a conversation with them and mostly they were good kids, but all it takes is one bad egg.

“I have always been a strong supporter of Rhythm and Vines. The money they bring into the town is awesome.

“We had people staying at our place going to the festival and they had the most amazing time.

Kids with nowhere to go

“It is just the kids with nowhere to go. They are just looking for somewhere to drink their booze before going into the festival. I was even thinking of offering them a field.”

The police presence and Maori wardens were good but it did not stop people dumping their rubbish, she said.

“We tried calling Gisborne District Council but they were closed. I found I was policing the street. I just wanted it to be over.

“Something has to be done.”

Resident Joe Pihema said festival-goers drank and partied at Waihirere Domain, outside the liquor ban area, leaving community members to clean up after them.

“To the police, the council and Rhythm and Vines, thanks for the hundreds of drunks who converged upon our village and domain at Waihirere to defecate, vomit, litter, hurl abuse and do whatever damn else they felt like doing.”

Volunteers collected two vans worth of bottles and rubbish.

Mr Pihema believes the liquor ban area should have been set at the beginning of Back Ormond Road, and not Waihirere Domain Road.

A Rhythm and Vines spokesperson said they conducted regular waste patrols of Waimata Valley Road, Kawatiri Road and Harper Road, and from Woodlands Campground (TW Estate) to Kawatiri Road on Back Ormond Road.

The festival also conducted daily rubbish collection at the bus stops frequented by Rhythm and Vines patrons, particularly Okitu and Fitzherbert Street bus stops.

“Rhythm and Vines works closely with Gisborne District Council on waste management and looks forward to a full debrief on this year’s festival in due course.”

At the festival itself they expect to see a significant reduction in the total amount of waste as a result of reusable glasses and more sustainable on-site tent options.

“We were stoked at how well the glasses were received by the festival attendees, with many taking them
home at the end of the festival as a souvenir.”

TIGHTER alcohol licensing restrictions on Rhythm and Vines has resulted in more rubbish dumped in areas around the festival site, leaving nearby residents having to clean it up.

Each night of the festival, resident Aubrey Ria on Back Ormond Road witnessed festival-goers pull up on the side of their road and down side roads — away from the liquor ban area — to pre-drink before heading to the festival.

Before heading on they would clear their cars out of bottles, cans, beer boxes — even some full of alcohol.

“The amount of rubbish this year is ridiculous, way more than other years,” Ms Ria said.

“We have been collecting it outside our home, and others have been collecting it up and down the roads. There is still loads there now.”

She believes people dumped their rubbish to remove evidence of drinking, so as not to break the new alcohol restrictions for Rhythm and Vines.

All cars were searched for alcohol before entering the festival carpark at Waiohika Estate vineyard, near Gray’s Bush.

Any alcohol found was confiscated and destroyed, and festival-goers could be issued a “yellow card” warning, which would be attached to the entry wristbands to restrict them from buying more alcohol.

A “red card” would be issued and the person removed from the event for a subsequent breach.

The measures were put in place to address police concerns over the amount of drinking in the carpark at last year’s event.

These measures added to a temporary liquor ban during Rhythm and Vines in the Gray’s Bush reserve and car park, Waimata Valley Road including the lookout, Back Ormond Road from Glenelg Road to Waihirere Domain Road, and Harper Road to Tucker Road.

Going outside the ban areas

Ms Ria said festival-goers simply went outside the liquor ban areas to drink.

“I have enjoyed Rhythm and Vines and it is a great experience, but we used to be able to take drinks into the carpark.

“Lots of kids come from out of town, come here to drink and party, but have nowhere to go.”

She saw girls urinating at the bus stop at the corner to Waihirere Domain.

“There needs to be designated drinking areas so they don’t resort to the side of the road.”

There should at least be rubbish bins in the area and even toilets, she said.

Waihirere resident Tangiwai Ria had a similar experience.

“All around our area there were cars parked along the road, biffing rubbish and bottles into the paddock.

“We had a conversation with them and mostly they were good kids, but all it takes is one bad egg.

“I have always been a strong supporter of Rhythm and Vines. The money they bring into the town is awesome.

“We had people staying at our place going to the festival and they had the most amazing time.

Kids with nowhere to go

“It is just the kids with nowhere to go. They are just looking for somewhere to drink their booze before going into the festival. I was even thinking of offering them a field.”

The police presence and Maori wardens were good but it did not stop people dumping their rubbish, she said.

“We tried calling Gisborne District Council but they were closed. I found I was policing the street. I just wanted it to be over.

“Something has to be done.”

Resident Joe Pihema said festival-goers drank and partied at Waihirere Domain, outside the liquor ban area, leaving community members to clean up after them.

“To the police, the council and Rhythm and Vines, thanks for the hundreds of drunks who converged upon our village and domain at Waihirere to defecate, vomit, litter, hurl abuse and do whatever damn else they felt like doing.”

Volunteers collected two vans worth of bottles and rubbish.

Mr Pihema believes the liquor ban area should have been set at the beginning of Back Ormond Road, and not Waihirere Domain Road.

A Rhythm and Vines spokesperson said they conducted regular waste patrols of Waimata Valley Road, Kawatiri Road and Harper Road, and from Woodlands Campground (TW Estate) to Kawatiri Road on Back Ormond Road.

The festival also conducted daily rubbish collection at the bus stops frequented by Rhythm and Vines patrons, particularly Okitu and Fitzherbert Street bus stops.

“Rhythm and Vines works closely with Gisborne District Council on waste management and looks forward to a full debrief on this year’s festival in due course.”

At the festival itself they expect to see a significant reduction in the total amount of waste as a result of reusable glasses and more sustainable on-site tent options.

“We were stoked at how well the glasses were received by the festival attendees, with many taking them
home at the end of the festival as a souvenir.”

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Disappointed local - 10 months ago
RnV spokesperson is full of sh#t! I saw NO rubbish picked up by anyone other than property owners for the whole RnV period (and I travelled the Makauri roads a lot over this period). The kids were drinking for many hours within the no drinking zone eg corner Harpers/Tuckers Rds, with no police or security patrols at all. Yes they were well behaved but they left a huge amount of rubbish and the RnV organisers that pocket huge profits didn't 'bother' to clean up the mess of those they had enticed to be there.

Ed note: RnV staff were seen yesterday cleaning up at Gray's Bush.

Alice McPhee - 10 months ago
There were teams of staff from RnV rubbish clean-up working into the late hours of every morning doing that run. I worked up until 2am few mornings. I know people are not awake at that time but, I can assure you these people were not out taking a morning stroll.

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