Four marlin landed on one huge fishing day

Plus a shortbilled spearfish caught by a junior angler

Plus a shortbilled spearfish caught by a junior angler

A 131.45kg striped marlin caught by the crew of Magnum is leading the chase for the $10,000 prize in the Gisborne-Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club’s Liquorland Marlin and Tuna Hunt. It was the first of four marlin landed yesterday, on the first day of the four-day competition.

From left are Roger Thorpe, Erle Tucker, Mike “Bondy” Bond (angler), Steve Telfer and skipper Mike Richmond.

Picture by Liam Clayton
Scott Arnold of Napier with his 128.55kg striped marlin.
NOT COMMON: Shortbilled spearfish are not common and young angler Joel Pearse was “stoked- as” to land one yesterday on the first day of the Gisborne-Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club’s Liquorland Marlin and Tuna Hunt.

Picture supplied
SECOND: This is Scott Arnold of Napier who was fishing off Lexington and caught this 128.55 kilogram striped marlin to take second place in the Gisborne-Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club’s Liquorland Marlin and Tuna Tournament.

Picture by Paul Rickard

FOUR marlin landed and a shortbilled spearfish caught by a “mad-keen” junior angler were highlights on day one of Gisborne-Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club’s Liquorland Marlin and Tuna Hunt. After only one marlin was landed in the Bay Bonanza competition two weeks ago, those catches were a great and encouraging start from the club’s point of view, said club president Roger Faber.

“All the boats are back out today. There was a bit of a breeze overnight, so there is a bit of a hump on the water but its still definitely fishable.”

The weather forecast was looking OK as well, he said.

“We are keeping a close eye on it. It looks better than it did originally and tomorrow should be OK too. The forecast keeps changing every time we look at it.”

The first marlin landed yesterday by Mike “Bondy” Bond and the crew on Magnum weighed in at 131.45 kilograms and is the front-runner for the $10,000 prize for the heaviest marlin or tuna in the competition. It was Bondy’s second marlin and hooking it up around 9am on the first day was very exciting, he said.

“We (crew of Roger Thorpe, Erle Tucker, Steve Telfer and skipper Mike Richmond) were all buzzing. It was a good team effort,” said Bondy.

It took about 35 minutes to land the marlin on 37kg line.

The fish is only just in the lead — Scott Arnold, fishing off Napier boat Lexington, weighed in a 128.55kg marlin and Murray “Mudguard” Doleman, fishing off his boat Taranui, caught a 119.30kg marlin.

The fourth marlin caught yesterday was not eligible for the competition because the boat was not entered. Weighing in at 130kg, it was caught by Daniel Laffey, fishing off Simply Red. Mr Faber said the crew had decided because of the weather they would not enter but went out fishing anyway.

Another big highlight of the day came from the boat C Controlher and junior angler nine-year-old Joel Pearse who landed a 26.40kg shortbilled spearfish.

“He is mad-keen on fishing and was stoked-as to catch the spearfish. They are not common,” said his dad Stu Pearse.

He has caught some albacore before and this is his first game fish.

“We got a double strike. Robbie (Lewis) had one and Joel the other one. Then Robbie’s one dropped, so it was all on for Joel.”

All the big fish will be smoked and eaten.

The fishing competition has a purse of $50,000 and runs until Sunday.

FOUR marlin landed and a shortbilled spearfish caught by a “mad-keen” junior angler were highlights on day one of Gisborne-Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club’s Liquorland Marlin and Tuna Hunt. After only one marlin was landed in the Bay Bonanza competition two weeks ago, those catches were a great and encouraging start from the club’s point of view, said club president Roger Faber.

“All the boats are back out today. There was a bit of a breeze overnight, so there is a bit of a hump on the water but its still definitely fishable.”

The weather forecast was looking OK as well, he said.

“We are keeping a close eye on it. It looks better than it did originally and tomorrow should be OK too. The forecast keeps changing every time we look at it.”

The first marlin landed yesterday by Mike “Bondy” Bond and the crew on Magnum weighed in at 131.45 kilograms and is the front-runner for the $10,000 prize for the heaviest marlin or tuna in the competition. It was Bondy’s second marlin and hooking it up around 9am on the first day was very exciting, he said.

“We (crew of Roger Thorpe, Erle Tucker, Steve Telfer and skipper Mike Richmond) were all buzzing. It was a good team effort,” said Bondy.

It took about 35 minutes to land the marlin on 37kg line.

The fish is only just in the lead — Scott Arnold, fishing off Napier boat Lexington, weighed in a 128.55kg marlin and Murray “Mudguard” Doleman, fishing off his boat Taranui, caught a 119.30kg marlin.

The fourth marlin caught yesterday was not eligible for the competition because the boat was not entered. Weighing in at 130kg, it was caught by Daniel Laffey, fishing off Simply Red. Mr Faber said the crew had decided because of the weather they would not enter but went out fishing anyway.

Another big highlight of the day came from the boat C Controlher and junior angler nine-year-old Joel Pearse who landed a 26.40kg shortbilled spearfish.

“He is mad-keen on fishing and was stoked-as to catch the spearfish. They are not common,” said his dad Stu Pearse.

He has caught some albacore before and this is his first game fish.

“We got a double strike. Robbie (Lewis) had one and Joel the other one. Then Robbie’s one dropped, so it was all on for Joel.”

All the big fish will be smoked and eaten.

The fishing competition has a purse of $50,000 and runs until Sunday.

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Bob Hughes - 1 month ago
To me big-game hunting for recreational sport and prize money is disrespectful to nature.
Land-based humans taking pleasure from hunting marine creatures in this gleeful way is even more so.
Only days before this hyped-up Liquorland event took place there was that solemn happening on Farewell Spit.
That rescue attempt involved an army of volunteers assisting and comforting hundreds of stranded sea mammals.
In one place a team of humans was doing all that was possible to rescue and preserve the life of amazing creatures. In the other there was another determined muster in an all out effort to hunt and end the lives of others. The irony of it all.
When I was a boy, trophy hunting of magnificent African big-game animals was in full swing. Most know now that was a mistake ? need I say more?
Records show many species of fish are declining. I fear a similar result from this open slather of the oceans from both commercial and recreational fishing could also end badly.
Killing magnificent creatures for recreational sport is not for me.

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