Wainui road as busy as central Wellington

And the traffic volume is increasing.

And the traffic volume is increasing.

HIGH traffic volume on Gisborne’s Wainui Road is similar to that of central Wellington, and it is going to increase.

The Regional Transport Committee was told this by district council strategic planning manager David Wilson at a meeting this week.

The volume of traffic on Wainui Road is one of the issues to be included in a network operating framework to be prepared as part of the regional land transport plan review.

Committee members were surprised to be told that there were 20,000 vehicle movements a day on Wainui Road last year.

Committee member Graeme Thomson asked if anybody had checked these figures.

Mr Wilson said one of the things that had come out of the port access process was that the council did not
have an overall operating framework, so it did not have an established map of where vehicles should be put in the future.

He stressed this was not just about heavy vehicles. It was about the vulnerable routes and how they could be integrated with the urban cycleways programme.

Traffic had increased significantly and that was not just heavy vehicles.

“Wainui Road has a very large number of vehicles for a city our size; 20,000 vehicle movements per day, which is a significant volume of traffic, considering the population of Gisborne and the wider region.”

Heavy vehicle numbers low

The number of heavy vehicles included in this figure, though, was low; only 3 percent of the vehicle movements a day.

People noticed trucks a lot more “because they are so big” but it was a volume of traffic moving down a two-lane road.

The 20,000 compared with Wellington (population 204,000), which had 21,000 movements a day on Aotea Quay.

“We are getting some big numbers down Wainui Road all day.”

The figures will be used to investigate an operating framework that will be brought back to the committee for approval.

Sam Aberahama said the committee would also have to take into account the projected population growth in the next 10 years.

One only had to look at Tauranga, he said. All the new roads were full now. It was a mini-Auckland and they would have tried to future-proof that.

Committee chairman Bill Burdett said the committee had major issues such as the number of logging trucks and heavy vehicles coming down Ormond Road. Awapuni Road was also overloaded.

Wall of wood

There was an increasing wall of wood to be moved plus economic development on the Flats.

Mr Thomson said he had looked at the figures for Wainui Road, which had five times the number of vehicles going along Awapuni Road to the industrial subdivision.

“This has been a surprise to all of us,” Mr Wilson said.

“Remember that it is cars moving in and out. It's not just one way.”

In 2005 there were 16,000 movements a day and the numbers showed the traffic was growing.

“It's something we are going to have to look at. Otherwise we are going to end up with a big issue."

Malcolm MacLean asked if they had thought of being modern, like Tauranga, and having fly-overs.

Mr Burdett said at one time an underpass was planned under Wainui Road to the port for the logging trucks but it did not go ahead.

Meredith Akuhata-Brown said the review was an exciting project.

“Just move all those trucks off Awapuni Road.”

HIGH traffic volume on Gisborne’s Wainui Road is similar to that of central Wellington, and it is going to increase.

The Regional Transport Committee was told this by district council strategic planning manager David Wilson at a meeting this week.

The volume of traffic on Wainui Road is one of the issues to be included in a network operating framework to be prepared as part of the regional land transport plan review.

Committee members were surprised to be told that there were 20,000 vehicle movements a day on Wainui Road last year.

Committee member Graeme Thomson asked if anybody had checked these figures.

Mr Wilson said one of the things that had come out of the port access process was that the council did not
have an overall operating framework, so it did not have an established map of where vehicles should be put in the future.

He stressed this was not just about heavy vehicles. It was about the vulnerable routes and how they could be integrated with the urban cycleways programme.

Traffic had increased significantly and that was not just heavy vehicles.

“Wainui Road has a very large number of vehicles for a city our size; 20,000 vehicle movements per day, which is a significant volume of traffic, considering the population of Gisborne and the wider region.”

Heavy vehicle numbers low

The number of heavy vehicles included in this figure, though, was low; only 3 percent of the vehicle movements a day.

People noticed trucks a lot more “because they are so big” but it was a volume of traffic moving down a two-lane road.

The 20,000 compared with Wellington (population 204,000), which had 21,000 movements a day on Aotea Quay.

“We are getting some big numbers down Wainui Road all day.”

The figures will be used to investigate an operating framework that will be brought back to the committee for approval.

Sam Aberahama said the committee would also have to take into account the projected population growth in the next 10 years.

One only had to look at Tauranga, he said. All the new roads were full now. It was a mini-Auckland and they would have tried to future-proof that.

Committee chairman Bill Burdett said the committee had major issues such as the number of logging trucks and heavy vehicles coming down Ormond Road. Awapuni Road was also overloaded.

Wall of wood

There was an increasing wall of wood to be moved plus economic development on the Flats.

Mr Thomson said he had looked at the figures for Wainui Road, which had five times the number of vehicles going along Awapuni Road to the industrial subdivision.

“This has been a surprise to all of us,” Mr Wilson said.

“Remember that it is cars moving in and out. It's not just one way.”

In 2005 there were 16,000 movements a day and the numbers showed the traffic was growing.

“It's something we are going to have to look at. Otherwise we are going to end up with a big issue."

Malcolm MacLean asked if they had thought of being modern, like Tauranga, and having fly-overs.

Mr Burdett said at one time an underpass was planned under Wainui Road to the port for the logging trucks but it did not go ahead.

Meredith Akuhata-Brown said the review was an exciting project.

“Just move all those trucks off Awapuni Road.”

Damn this traffic jam, how I hate to be late, it hurts my motor to go so slow.
Damn this traffic jam, time I get home my supper'll be cold, damn this traffic jam.

James Taylor

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Bronwyn - 2 years ago
I believe some form of roundabout is required from the wharf side of the Esplanade.
At peak traffic hours it's almost impossible to head north from here.

winston moreton - 2 years ago
Our Regional Land Transport committee was the lead story on the front page of The Gisborne Herald on Saturday. And rightly so. Heavy traffic on our roads chew rates as well as macadam. Wainui Road in particular, because it is the congregation point of every single logging truck arriving at the port turn-off. There is one in the front page photo.
Members of the Regional Committee were reported as being surprised at the volume of vehicles. The chairman, Cr Burdett, however scotched any suggestion this is an unexpected development. He recollected a plan to provide logging trucks with an underpass to the port and in so doing acknowledges senior council members have had their heads in the sand and failed the community. Once again the might of ECT and its Eastland Group prevail to stifle community advancement. Moreover, the apparent failure of our regional committee councillors to consider the benefits of trucking logs to a rail head suggests a weakness in the strategic planning report. One can only hope that the revised version, now under way, will be completed urgently and have a section dealing with the pros and cons of a rail head for the truckies to deliver to. This would lower the obvious risk of a ghastly incident in the city precinct.
Cr Meredith Akuhata-Brown, still a newish councillor, put her finger on the hard spot when she said "Just move all those trucks off Awapuni Road."
I take this opportunity to wonder why members of our important Regional Land Transport committee are not paid at regional council rates. It appears they only receive standard district councillor remuneration. And why was Mayor Meng Foon not in attendance?

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