Honouring our WWI nurses online

Inrteractive maps and timelines add to Museum exhibition

Inrteractive maps and timelines add to Museum exhibition

ZEPPELIN RAID! 'Every place had been warned and the public were all out in the streets, men, women and little children in wraps ... The munitions works are a little distant from town so we drove, and when we reached the big gates we found that there were also hundreds of men outside ... Fancy a Zeppelin had flown right over the works and over the town.' Image courtesy of Old Pics
One of the interactive maps, which will go live on the Herald's website next week.
A section from one of the interactive timelines, which trace the nurses' journeys chronologically.
The Recovery exhibition, not to be missed at the Museum, opens on March 24.

TAIRAWHITI Museum goes back in time next Friday, 100 years to the days of World War 1.

That is when Recovery: Women’s Overseas Service in World War 1 is launched at the museum.

Professor Kay Morris Matthews will launch her book and exhibition (both of the same name) in partnership with Tairawhiti Museum.

Recovery will be supported by an interactive digital presentation on the Gisborne Herald website compiled by digital editor Andrew McKenna.

Professor Matthews describes what Mr McKenna has done as “a welcome and unique feature of the forthcoming exhibition”.

The exhibition includes information and images of 15 Gisborne-East Coast women who served overseas during the war, but it also tells what the women did before and after the conflict.

Professor Matthews said there were very few images to accompany the other 29 profiles, as presented in the final section of the Exhibition book.

Timelines

“I wondered just how Andrew would be able to work with what I had sent him.

“Andrew has developed a timeline across their life span, as well as a map depicting the places they lived and worked.

“For many, their work during World War 1 took them to a variety of war zones across four to five years.

“By clicking on the computer-driven interactive presentation, the viewer is transported back in time.

“Not only is the text I provided included in each slide, but so are other images Andrew has sourced, both photographic and from documentary film footage.

“For example, as Mabel Hyde from Gisborne reflects on her experiences during a Zeppelin bombing raid, Andrew has added in images of Mabel plus a film clip of a Zeppelin attack..

“Thus, the biographical profile is transformed from static text to the viewer being able to imagine the setting and what it was like to be there at the time.”

Mr McKenna said he started the project because he knew the museum was “doing this wonderful exhibition’’.

Maps

“I wanted to add another dimension. I thought it would be good to map out where the women had gone.”

Mr McKenna said some of the women travelled to less usual destinations such as East Africa, while others had gone to well-known World War 1 locales such as Gallipoli, or served on troop ships and in hospitals in England.

The women must have worked or travelled in “appalling conditions”.

Professor Matthews’ research also revealed the flavours of the times, he said.

Some women paid their own way to the Northern Hemisphere. Others had previously travelled to New Zealand from England and were happy to go “home’’. Some stayed in England after the war.

“The museum found some great images. They have done a fantastic job.’’

He has sourced some good photographs and maps. His online work covers the following women: Agnes Allan, Agnes Kerr, Agnes Clark, Annie Westoby, Annie Draper, Caroline Wallace, Catherine Martin, Christabel MacFarlane, Edith Lewis, Elsie Curtis, Elvie Kidd, Emily Wallace, Florence Gill, Gertrude (Kate) Garrard, Ivy Smale, Jessie Walker, Mary Eaddy, Mary Craig, Olive Malcolm, Robina (Ruby) Cameron, Rose Palmer, Ruby Kelly and Stella Barr.

The interactive display will go live next Friday night in conjunction with the Recovery launch at Tairawhiti Museum, which starts at 5pm.

The museum was packed when Professor Matthews presented her original research last year and a similarly-sized audience is anticipated next week. Entry is free.

TAIRAWHITI Museum goes back in time next Friday, 100 years to the days of World War 1.

That is when Recovery: Women’s Overseas Service in World War 1 is launched at the museum.

Professor Kay Morris Matthews will launch her book and exhibition (both of the same name) in partnership with Tairawhiti Museum.

Recovery will be supported by an interactive digital presentation on the Gisborne Herald website compiled by digital editor Andrew McKenna.

Professor Matthews describes what Mr McKenna has done as “a welcome and unique feature of the forthcoming exhibition”.

The exhibition includes information and images of 15 Gisborne-East Coast women who served overseas during the war, but it also tells what the women did before and after the conflict.

Professor Matthews said there were very few images to accompany the other 29 profiles, as presented in the final section of the Exhibition book.

Timelines

“I wondered just how Andrew would be able to work with what I had sent him.

“Andrew has developed a timeline across their life span, as well as a map depicting the places they lived and worked.

“For many, their work during World War 1 took them to a variety of war zones across four to five years.

“By clicking on the computer-driven interactive presentation, the viewer is transported back in time.

“Not only is the text I provided included in each slide, but so are other images Andrew has sourced, both photographic and from documentary film footage.

“For example, as Mabel Hyde from Gisborne reflects on her experiences during a Zeppelin bombing raid, Andrew has added in images of Mabel plus a film clip of a Zeppelin attack..

“Thus, the biographical profile is transformed from static text to the viewer being able to imagine the setting and what it was like to be there at the time.”

Mr McKenna said he started the project because he knew the museum was “doing this wonderful exhibition’’.

Maps

“I wanted to add another dimension. I thought it would be good to map out where the women had gone.”

Mr McKenna said some of the women travelled to less usual destinations such as East Africa, while others had gone to well-known World War 1 locales such as Gallipoli, or served on troop ships and in hospitals in England.

The women must have worked or travelled in “appalling conditions”.

Professor Matthews’ research also revealed the flavours of the times, he said.

Some women paid their own way to the Northern Hemisphere. Others had previously travelled to New Zealand from England and were happy to go “home’’. Some stayed in England after the war.

“The museum found some great images. They have done a fantastic job.’’

He has sourced some good photographs and maps. His online work covers the following women: Agnes Allan, Agnes Kerr, Agnes Clark, Annie Westoby, Annie Draper, Caroline Wallace, Catherine Martin, Christabel MacFarlane, Edith Lewis, Elsie Curtis, Elvie Kidd, Emily Wallace, Florence Gill, Gertrude (Kate) Garrard, Ivy Smale, Jessie Walker, Mary Eaddy, Mary Craig, Olive Malcolm, Robina (Ruby) Cameron, Rose Palmer, Ruby Kelly and Stella Barr.

The interactive display will go live next Friday night in conjunction with the Recovery launch at Tairawhiti Museum, which starts at 5pm.

The museum was packed when Professor Matthews presented her original research last year and a similarly-sized audience is anticipated next week. Entry is free.

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