R and V Festival partner talks

Rhythm and Vines seeks a 'strategic patner'.

Rhythm and Vines seeks a 'strategic patner'.

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RHYTHM and Vines management is in discussion about a potential partnership with a live events company, but Gisborne’s party people and retailers can be assured the festival will be “business as usual”, said the R and V festival co-founder Hamish Pinkham.

“We are in discussion with Live Nation but nothing is confirmed at this stage.

“There has been an expression of interest and we are in discussion about how a partnership will best suit the festival going forward.”

Rhythm and Vines management has been looking for a strategic partner for some time to “solidify the concept”.

Should the partnership go ahead, the popular music festival held annually at Waiohika Estate will still be business as usual, he said.

The intention of any R and V partnership is to strengthen the festival model to ensure its longevity in Gisborne for many years to come.

“It is exciting.”

Live Nation Australia and New Zealand is a live entertainment company comprising four market leaders: Ticketmaster, Live Nation Concerts, Artist Nation Management and Live Nation Media/Sponsorship.

Held in Gisborne over the new year period, the three-day Rhythm and Vines festival is the first in the world to welcome in the first sunrise of the new year.

The festival was founded in 2003 by University of Otago friends Hamish Pinkham, Tom Gibson and Andrew Witters. The festival was founded with the support of Dean Witters, Mr Pinkham said.

From a one-stage festival with 1800 guests in 2003, to a two-stage event with an attendance of 5500, the festival continued to grow in popularity over the next few years. In 2008, the festival became a three-day event, which enabled organisers to contract bands on the international touring circuit.

R and V reached a record breaking, capacity crowd of 25,000 in 2010 and was a sell-out for the first time as a three-day festival.

Festival management continued to tweak its formula each year to bring in new attractions while ensuring safe alcohol usage for festival-goers. In 2014, R and V brought in fire-breathers, 2015 saw motocross riders jumping across the main Vines stage, as well as comedy under the banner Giggle and Vines.

In a first for the international music festival at Waiohika Estate, last year tickets sold out before Christmas.

“We really have had remarkable feedback to R&V in this 14th year,” Mr Pinkham said.

“It just shows people are really digging the new direction for the festival.”

RHYTHM and Vines management is in discussion about a potential partnership with a live events company, but Gisborne’s party people and retailers can be assured the festival will be “business as usual”, said the R and V festival co-founder Hamish Pinkham.

“We are in discussion with Live Nation but nothing is confirmed at this stage.

“There has been an expression of interest and we are in discussion about how a partnership will best suit the festival going forward.”

Rhythm and Vines management has been looking for a strategic partner for some time to “solidify the concept”.

Should the partnership go ahead, the popular music festival held annually at Waiohika Estate will still be business as usual, he said.

The intention of any R and V partnership is to strengthen the festival model to ensure its longevity in Gisborne for many years to come.

“It is exciting.”

Live Nation Australia and New Zealand is a live entertainment company comprising four market leaders: Ticketmaster, Live Nation Concerts, Artist Nation Management and Live Nation Media/Sponsorship.

Held in Gisborne over the new year period, the three-day Rhythm and Vines festival is the first in the world to welcome in the first sunrise of the new year.

The festival was founded in 2003 by University of Otago friends Hamish Pinkham, Tom Gibson and Andrew Witters. The festival was founded with the support of Dean Witters, Mr Pinkham said.

From a one-stage festival with 1800 guests in 2003, to a two-stage event with an attendance of 5500, the festival continued to grow in popularity over the next few years. In 2008, the festival became a three-day event, which enabled organisers to contract bands on the international touring circuit.

R and V reached a record breaking, capacity crowd of 25,000 in 2010 and was a sell-out for the first time as a three-day festival.

Festival management continued to tweak its formula each year to bring in new attractions while ensuring safe alcohol usage for festival-goers. In 2014, R and V brought in fire-breathers, 2015 saw motocross riders jumping across the main Vines stage, as well as comedy under the banner Giggle and Vines.

In a first for the international music festival at Waiohika Estate, last year tickets sold out before Christmas.

“We really have had remarkable feedback to R&V in this 14th year,” Mr Pinkham said.

“It just shows people are really digging the new direction for the festival.”

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