Cellphone sparks callout

Acrid smoke leads to explosion fear.

Acrid smoke leads to explosion fear.

REPAIRS to the broken screen of a Samsung S7 cellphone sparked a fire service callout last night when the lithium-ion battery inside was accidentally pierced and it started to smoke.

Firefighters were called to a house in outer Mangapapa at around 9pm.

“The resident had been attempting to replace the broken cellphone screen,” said Station Officer Trent Fearnley.

“To do so he needed to remove the credit card-sized battery inside. He used a pair of tweezers to try to remove the lithium-ion battery but he accidentally pierced it and the battery started to react.

“It started to give off an acrid-smelling smoke and the residents were worried it might be about to explode,” SO Fearnley said.

“They immediately called us and evacuated the house.”

When the fire crew arrived they picked the battery up from the floor of a bedroom where it had been left, and removed it outside to a place of safety.

“It was warm to touch but had stopped smoking when we got there — so it did not actually catch fire,” said SO Fearnley.

“The residents did the right things in evacuating their home and calling us.”

Senior Station Officer Ed Hindmarsh said people should take care when trying to carry out repairs on anything that contains a lithium-ion battery.

“There have been significant fires caused by faults with this type of battery, used in cellphones, also in remote control aircraft and other similar appliances.”

REPAIRS to the broken screen of a Samsung S7 cellphone sparked a fire service callout last night when the lithium-ion battery inside was accidentally pierced and it started to smoke.

Firefighters were called to a house in outer Mangapapa at around 9pm.

“The resident had been attempting to replace the broken cellphone screen,” said Station Officer Trent Fearnley.

“To do so he needed to remove the credit card-sized battery inside. He used a pair of tweezers to try to remove the lithium-ion battery but he accidentally pierced it and the battery started to react.

“It started to give off an acrid-smelling smoke and the residents were worried it might be about to explode,” SO Fearnley said.

“They immediately called us and evacuated the house.”

When the fire crew arrived they picked the battery up from the floor of a bedroom where it had been left, and removed it outside to a place of safety.

“It was warm to touch but had stopped smoking when we got there — so it did not actually catch fire,” said SO Fearnley.

“The residents did the right things in evacuating their home and calling us.”

Senior Station Officer Ed Hindmarsh said people should take care when trying to carry out repairs on anything that contains a lithium-ion battery.

“There have been significant fires caused by faults with this type of battery, used in cellphones, also in remote control aircraft and other similar appliances.”

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