Cameras fitted to reduce abuse

Council employees get behind the lens for safety and security.

Council employees get behind the lens for safety and security.

KITTED OUT: Gisborne’s parking wardens Kiri and Ross model the new body cameras all GDC enforcement and monitoring teams are now wearing, with Tom from the city watch, Ross from animal control, Ian Sambrook (Computerz and More), and Ron from the city watch. Picture by Paul Rickard

GISBORNE parking wardens, dog control officers and city watch patrols have been given an extra tool to help prevent and reduce the amount of abuse they have to put up with.

They have been kitted out with new cameras to record public interactions.

GDC enforcement manager Jim Single said council parking, city watch, and animal control, monitoring and compliance staff will now wear new hi-tech body-worn camera equipment in response to recent Health and Safety requirements.

Mr Single said councils throughout New Zealand were either using or initiating body-worn cameras for enforcement staff in particular.

“These cameras are a proven tool to reduce violence and abuse towards staff. They also have other benefits, such as for evidential purposes.

“They have been employed mainly for safety and security of staff and to help deter verbal and physical abuse that does occur.

"They will also be used for documenting evidence and recording interviews.

“The council trialled a number of camera types before selecting a robust, weatherproof model from locally-owned business Computerz and More.”

Fifteen of the $500 cameras have been bought and staff began wearing them this week.

GISBORNE parking wardens, dog control officers and city watch patrols have been given an extra tool to help prevent and reduce the amount of abuse they have to put up with.

They have been kitted out with new cameras to record public interactions.

GDC enforcement manager Jim Single said council parking, city watch, and animal control, monitoring and compliance staff will now wear new hi-tech body-worn camera equipment in response to recent Health and Safety requirements.

Mr Single said councils throughout New Zealand were either using or initiating body-worn cameras for enforcement staff in particular.

“These cameras are a proven tool to reduce violence and abuse towards staff. They also have other benefits, such as for evidential purposes.

“They have been employed mainly for safety and security of staff and to help deter verbal and physical abuse that does occur.

"They will also be used for documenting evidence and recording interviews.

“The council trialled a number of camera types before selecting a robust, weatherproof model from locally-owned business Computerz and More.”

Fifteen of the $500 cameras have been bought and staff began wearing them this week.

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