Second judge for Gisborne

Will also cover Family Court jurisdiction.

Will also cover Family Court jurisdiction.

Gisborne Courthouse. File picture

GISBORNE will get a second resident District Court judge, one who also holds a Family Court warrant, when Taranaki lawyer Haamiora Raumati is sworn in on April 3 at New Plymouth.

He will be based in Gisborne, with a warrant “to exercise civil and criminal jurisdiction within New Zealand, and to exercise the jurisdiction of the Family Courts”.

New Zealand Law Society’s Gisborne Branch has welcomed the news.

A spokesperson said lawyers were looking forward to having a second resident judge in Gisborne.

Since Judge Warren Cathcart’s appointment in 2015, the bar had believed a second resident judge was required.

Gisborne’s previous resident judge Neil MacLean was not replaced when he was transferred to Hamilton in 1999 because Gisborne District Court was not considered sufficiently busy to require one.

It was not a decision universally supported in Gisborne at the time.

The law society spokesperson said Gisborne was a smaller District Court area, but Judge Raumati would also have a Family Court warrant.

‘“The reality is that Gisborne does have a reasonable amount of serious crime, giving the District Court a high work load.”

Mr Raumati has practised law in New Plymouth since 1995.

He moved to RMY Legal (formerly Reeves Middleton Young) in 1999 and was made a partner in 2002.

Mr Raumati has experience in all areas of family law and served as a lawyer for the Child and Youth Advocate.

He has described working in “the often complex field of relationship property law’’ as very rewarding.

Mr Raumati should enjoy the surf breaks of Gisborne.

He enjoys surfing in Taranaki and snowboarding, and is a rugby fan — serving as the honorary solicitor for the Taranaki Rugby Football Union.

Mr Raumati is believed to have links to Gisborne through the shearing community.

He will take up his position in Gisborne District Court in May.

GISBORNE will get a second resident District Court judge, one who also holds a Family Court warrant, when Taranaki lawyer Haamiora Raumati is sworn in on April 3 at New Plymouth.

He will be based in Gisborne, with a warrant “to exercise civil and criminal jurisdiction within New Zealand, and to exercise the jurisdiction of the Family Courts”.

New Zealand Law Society’s Gisborne Branch has welcomed the news.

A spokesperson said lawyers were looking forward to having a second resident judge in Gisborne.

Since Judge Warren Cathcart’s appointment in 2015, the bar had believed a second resident judge was required.

Gisborne’s previous resident judge Neil MacLean was not replaced when he was transferred to Hamilton in 1999 because Gisborne District Court was not considered sufficiently busy to require one.

It was not a decision universally supported in Gisborne at the time.

The law society spokesperson said Gisborne was a smaller District Court area, but Judge Raumati would also have a Family Court warrant.

‘“The reality is that Gisborne does have a reasonable amount of serious crime, giving the District Court a high work load.”

Mr Raumati has practised law in New Plymouth since 1995.

He moved to RMY Legal (formerly Reeves Middleton Young) in 1999 and was made a partner in 2002.

Mr Raumati has experience in all areas of family law and served as a lawyer for the Child and Youth Advocate.

He has described working in “the often complex field of relationship property law’’ as very rewarding.

Mr Raumati should enjoy the surf breaks of Gisborne.

He enjoys surfing in Taranaki and snowboarding, and is a rugby fan — serving as the honorary solicitor for the Taranaki Rugby Football Union.

Mr Raumati is believed to have links to Gisborne through the shearing community.

He will take up his position in Gisborne District Court in May.

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