Maori tourism potential on agenda

Cultural tourism, apiary development and other matters supported through regional investment focus of Te Puni Kokiri Ikaroa-Rawhiti.

Cultural tourism, apiary development and other matters supported through regional investment focus of Te Puni Kokiri Ikaroa-Rawhiti.

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THERE is tremendous potential in the cultural tourism sector for the Tairawhiti area, says Te Puni Kokiri Ikaroa-Rawhiti office regional manager Mere Pohatu.

A Tairawhiti Cultural Tourism discussion will be held at Te Puni Kokiri offices tomorrow from 10.30am.

“Cultural tourism, apiary development, drivers licensing and whanau enterprise are some of the initiatives supported through the regional investment focus of Te Puni Kokiri Ikaroa-Rawhiti office.

“While rural production and the commercial services sectors are our district’s biggest wealth creators, we know there is tremendous potential in the cultural tourism industry here,” she said.

Representatives of Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou, Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa, Ngati Kahungunu ki Te Wairoa, Maori tourism operators and Activate Tairawhiti, the district’s economic development agency, will be present at the meeting.

Andrew Te Whaiti, former chief executive of Te Puia in Rotorua and a cultural tourism expert will present and discuss indigenous tourism models and outline potential opportunities.

A Maori Tourism Panel made up of former Maori Affairs staff will sit over the morning’s discussions.

Findings from the Tairawhiti Maori Economic Development Report released earlier this year suggest tourism packages such as powhiri, hunting, fishing charters, hangi, kapa haka, guided historical tours, eco-tourism and arts and crafts are activities that could be established quite easily.

However, the report also highlighted that promotion of Maori tourism products, to draw the right consumer, needs a more sophisticated approach.

“So the purpose of this lunch is to arrive at a single view of what cultural tourism is in Te Tairawhiti, and how each of the member organisations around the table contribute to that view,” said Mrs Pohatu.

The event is also an opportunity for Te Puni Kokiri to announce its re-location.

“We are sad to be leaving our current location. The Maori Affairs Department within government has been on this site for many decades. However our requirements have exceeded the building’s capacity,” she said.

Te Puni Kokiri is moving to the former Mayfair building on the corner of Cobden Street and Gladstone Road.

THERE is tremendous potential in the cultural tourism sector for the Tairawhiti area, says Te Puni Kokiri Ikaroa-Rawhiti office regional manager Mere Pohatu.

A Tairawhiti Cultural Tourism discussion will be held at Te Puni Kokiri offices tomorrow from 10.30am.

“Cultural tourism, apiary development, drivers licensing and whanau enterprise are some of the initiatives supported through the regional investment focus of Te Puni Kokiri Ikaroa-Rawhiti office.

“While rural production and the commercial services sectors are our district’s biggest wealth creators, we know there is tremendous potential in the cultural tourism industry here,” she said.

Representatives of Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou, Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa, Ngati Kahungunu ki Te Wairoa, Maori tourism operators and Activate Tairawhiti, the district’s economic development agency, will be present at the meeting.

Andrew Te Whaiti, former chief executive of Te Puia in Rotorua and a cultural tourism expert will present and discuss indigenous tourism models and outline potential opportunities.

A Maori Tourism Panel made up of former Maori Affairs staff will sit over the morning’s discussions.

Findings from the Tairawhiti Maori Economic Development Report released earlier this year suggest tourism packages such as powhiri, hunting, fishing charters, hangi, kapa haka, guided historical tours, eco-tourism and arts and crafts are activities that could be established quite easily.

However, the report also highlighted that promotion of Maori tourism products, to draw the right consumer, needs a more sophisticated approach.

“So the purpose of this lunch is to arrive at a single view of what cultural tourism is in Te Tairawhiti, and how each of the member organisations around the table contribute to that view,” said Mrs Pohatu.

The event is also an opportunity for Te Puni Kokiri to announce its re-location.

“We are sad to be leaving our current location. The Maori Affairs Department within government has been on this site for many decades. However our requirements have exceeded the building’s capacity,” she said.

Te Puni Kokiri is moving to the former Mayfair building on the corner of Cobden Street and Gladstone Road.

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