Stock control laws open for submissions

Farm animals and roads don't mix and GDC is reviewing 2008 stock control bylaw.

Farm animals and roads don't mix and GDC is reviewing 2008 stock control bylaw.

PROPOSED new responsibilities for land owners to ensure stock do not wander on to the district’s roads are open for submissions.

Gisborne District Council is reviewing the 2008 stock control bylaw that deals with controls for droving, grazing of stock on road sides and wandering stock.

Enforcement manager Jim Single says the council and Tairawhiti Roads have identified issues that lead to stock on roads and the potential to result in harm to the public.

“In the last 10 years 149 accidents have been recorded as a result of wandering stock. A majority of accidents occurred on state highways.”

The bylaw will require owners to take more responsibility for ensuring stock do not wander on to roads and fence property boundaries next to a road or beach.

Fences would need to be in place within one year for paddocks next to State Highways and three years for local roads and beaches.

“We are also proposing to prohibit roadside grazing or tethering on a State Highway or beach,” Mr Single said.

“The bylaw will allow grazing stock on local road sides without permits if the required standards are met and the owner is responsible for any damage as a result of grazing.

“It also proposes farmers will need to have a permit for droving on State Highways and for local roads in cases where standards are not met.”

The draft Stock Control Bylaw 2017 is available to read on the council’s website or from customer service centres in Gladstone Road and Te Puia Springs.

PROPOSED new responsibilities for land owners to ensure stock do not wander on to the district’s roads are open for submissions.

Gisborne District Council is reviewing the 2008 stock control bylaw that deals with controls for droving, grazing of stock on road sides and wandering stock.

Enforcement manager Jim Single says the council and Tairawhiti Roads have identified issues that lead to stock on roads and the potential to result in harm to the public.

“In the last 10 years 149 accidents have been recorded as a result of wandering stock. A majority of accidents occurred on state highways.”

The bylaw will require owners to take more responsibility for ensuring stock do not wander on to roads and fence property boundaries next to a road or beach.

Fences would need to be in place within one year for paddocks next to State Highways and three years for local roads and beaches.

“We are also proposing to prohibit roadside grazing or tethering on a State Highway or beach,” Mr Single said.

“The bylaw will allow grazing stock on local road sides without permits if the required standards are met and the owner is responsible for any damage as a result of grazing.

“It also proposes farmers will need to have a permit for droving on State Highways and for local roads in cases where standards are not met.”

The draft Stock Control Bylaw 2017 is available to read on the council’s website or from customer service centres in Gladstone Road and Te Puia Springs.

For more information or any questions on the proposed bylaw contact the council’s policy team on 068672049 or email stockcontrol.bylaw@gdc.govt.nz.

Submissions can be made online or in writing.

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