Gisborne shares boom in tourism

Huge contribution to holiday parks.

Huge contribution to holiday parks.

Our surf is a big attraction to domestic and international visitors. File picture

VISITORS staying at holiday parks in the Gisborne-East Cape region last year pumped a whopping $20.9 million into the community, with new research showing the majority of that was spent on retail, fuel, food and admission fees.

New research carried out for Holiday Parks New Zealand (HAPNZ) has found that visitors to 11 holiday parks across the Gisborne regional tourism organisation area, which includes Wairoa and Opotiki, spent a combined $20.9 to the end of December, with $16.4m of that coming from domestic tourists, spending $113.73 a day.

International tourists, while accounting for just 14 percent of total guest nights, spend $190.46 a day.

Waikanae Beach Top 10 Holiday Park business manager Matt Moore said the latest research from Angus and Associates made sense and corroborated the GHL-owned park’s own findings.

“There are 11 holiday parks in the district and a lot of them are open only in summer, like Anaura Bay.”

The research detailed just how huge the industry was for the region, he said.

“I don’t think most people in Gisborne realise just what a huge number it is. It’s not just Waikanae Beach, its across the region, and we don’t have a lot of holidays parks compared to other regions.

“I had always assumed the industry accounted for about 30 percent of the market here, and these figures verify that.”

Two holiday parks

Mr Moore pointed out there were only two holiday parks in the city, which included Showgrounds Park.

Accommodation accounted for only $46.3m of the total spend.

“That means there is 60 percent more money spent on activities, fuel and restaurants.”

International visitors here spent just $785,100 on accommodation but nearly $4m on other community-based expenditure, with transport costs and activities/admission fees accounting for nearly $1m each.

Nationally, visitors staying at holiday parks contribute more than $1 billion a year to New Zealand’s economy,
International visitors shell out $490 million (46 percent), while New Zealanders spend $578 million (54 percent).

Expenditure by international visitors contributes directly to New Zealand’s export earnings.

Nationally, domestic visitors account for just 66 percent of spend, much less than the 86 percent they accounted for in Gisborne.

HAPNZ chief executive Fergus Brown said the research found some interesting differences in expenditure of international and domestic holiday park visitors.

“International visitors spend significantly more on activities, attractions and transport, while domestic visitors spend slightly more on accommodation and goods such as snacks and groceries.

“International visitors also have a much shorter average length of stay at a holiday park: three nights, compared with seven nights by domestic visitors.

“So while international visitors spend more on a daily basis, domestic visitors spend more per stay. For this reason, both markets continue to be important to the sector, as each offers different benefits.”

VISITORS staying at holiday parks in the Gisborne-East Cape region last year pumped a whopping $20.9 million into the community, with new research showing the majority of that was spent on retail, fuel, food and admission fees.

New research carried out for Holiday Parks New Zealand (HAPNZ) has found that visitors to 11 holiday parks across the Gisborne regional tourism organisation area, which includes Wairoa and Opotiki, spent a combined $20.9 to the end of December, with $16.4m of that coming from domestic tourists, spending $113.73 a day.

International tourists, while accounting for just 14 percent of total guest nights, spend $190.46 a day.

Waikanae Beach Top 10 Holiday Park business manager Matt Moore said the latest research from Angus and Associates made sense and corroborated the GHL-owned park’s own findings.

“There are 11 holiday parks in the district and a lot of them are open only in summer, like Anaura Bay.”

The research detailed just how huge the industry was for the region, he said.

“I don’t think most people in Gisborne realise just what a huge number it is. It’s not just Waikanae Beach, its across the region, and we don’t have a lot of holidays parks compared to other regions.

“I had always assumed the industry accounted for about 30 percent of the market here, and these figures verify that.”

Two holiday parks

Mr Moore pointed out there were only two holiday parks in the city, which included Showgrounds Park.

Accommodation accounted for only $46.3m of the total spend.

“That means there is 60 percent more money spent on activities, fuel and restaurants.”

International visitors here spent just $785,100 on accommodation but nearly $4m on other community-based expenditure, with transport costs and activities/admission fees accounting for nearly $1m each.

Nationally, visitors staying at holiday parks contribute more than $1 billion a year to New Zealand’s economy,
International visitors shell out $490 million (46 percent), while New Zealanders spend $578 million (54 percent).

Expenditure by international visitors contributes directly to New Zealand’s export earnings.

Nationally, domestic visitors account for just 66 percent of spend, much less than the 86 percent they accounted for in Gisborne.

HAPNZ chief executive Fergus Brown said the research found some interesting differences in expenditure of international and domestic holiday park visitors.

“International visitors spend significantly more on activities, attractions and transport, while domestic visitors spend slightly more on accommodation and goods such as snacks and groceries.

“International visitors also have a much shorter average length of stay at a holiday park: three nights, compared with seven nights by domestic visitors.

“So while international visitors spend more on a daily basis, domestic visitors spend more per stay. For this reason, both markets continue to be important to the sector, as each offers different benefits.”

• Tourism Eastland president David Sly said overall the accommodation sector was doing well here, with motel booking demand high for the approaching Easter holiday.

Mr Sly said that built on two good months in January and February.

“In January 2017, compared with January 2016, there was an increase of 15.5 percent in total guest nights for the Gisborne Regional Tourism Organisation area. For the year ended January 2017, compared with the previous January year, total guest nights for the Gisborne RTO area increased 12 percent.

“It is pleasing to see that the Gisborne region is not missing out on the New Zealand-wide tourism boom. This just does not happen overnight, but has been created in part by Tourism Eastland’s two to five-year marketing plan for the region.”

Accommodation figures did not include cruise ship visitors to Gisborne.

Meanwhile, the latest monthly regional tourism estimates released by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) show that tourism spend for Gisborne is estimated to be $135 million for the year to February 2017, up 6 percent compared with the year to February 2016.

Of that figure, international visitors spent $28 million (up 11 percent compared with the year to February 2016), and domestic tourists spent $107 million (up 4 percent).

Month-to-month comparisons show tourist spending in Gisborne for the month of February 2017 is up 4 percent compared with February 2016.

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