Tairawhiti Navigations Project $3.5m over budget

Major decisions ahead.

Major decisions ahead.

THE go-ahead for three major aspects of the Tairawhiti Navigations Project will be sought from Gisborne District Council tomorrow, including the long-awaited redevelopment of the inner harbour area, although existing funding of $10 million is at least $3.5m short of what is needed for the full projects to be implemented.

Councillors are being asked to approve an historical interpretations strategy, full implementation of which would cost almost $1.5m more than the $1m budgeted — with options down to the remaining budget of $530,000 and less included — and to approve a designer for the Turanganui River bridge project that will link the Waikanae Stream area with the slipway.

The council has been involved in lengthy discussions for years on the inner harbour project, notably with boat owners and Gisborne Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club.

As recently as a month ago the then chief executive Judy Campbell told them no agreement had been reached.

Councillors are being told in a report for tomorrow’s full council meeting that the concept plans for phase one are now ready for a resource consent to be lodged.

Project manager De-Arne Sutherland is recommending that the council adopt option two for the inner harbour project.

One of two options that will be considered, option two would involve full implementation of the project at a cost of $5m. It would involve seeking further external funding to cover a projected $2m shortfall.

The other option would be to reduce the scale and specifications of the project to keep it within budget.

Feedback from ECT

Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann will make a presentation to Eastland Community Trust on May 1 to receive feedback on their funding allocations and preferences.

Phase one of the inner harbour development includes a new pedestrian promenade providing safe access through the inner harbour leading to Titirangi Domain, the central business district, the Oneroa cycle and walkway, and the intended Wainui Road-Rutene Road cycleway.

The Esplanade and Crawford Road will be redeveloped and landscaped with rain gardens to treat stormwater run-off.

There will be a slight increase in parking in The Esplanade, The Works and Soho areas. A new carpark will be formed adjacent to Soho and expansion of The Works carpark will provide fit-for-purpose boat trailer parking. The boat trailer parks are designed so that vehicles can drive in and out, meaning reversing with a trailer will not be needed.

The existing waterfront carparks will remain until phase two of the project is constructed. It is suggested that phase two be consulted on, as part of the long-term plan process, early next year.

Historical interpretations project

The historical interpretations project will involve trail markers, view shafts and the bridge to the slipway, which is the nearest point to where the rock Toka a Taiau, the first formal meeting place between Europeans and Maori in 1769, used to be.

The council is being asked to approve Auckland architects and design firm Monk McKenzie/Navare, one of seven original applicants, as the preferred bridge designer.

The report says the port company has set aside $1.6m for shaping work on the slipway, although it has been told the cost of this is more likely to be $3.9m.

Eastland Port general manager Andrew Gaddum this morning said: “Reshaping the slipway at Eastland Port is budgeted to cost $3.8m and is just one part of a larger project to future-proof the port.”

Councillors are told in the report that the interpretations project has a budget of $1m, secured from Eastland Community Trust. There is a remaining budget of $530,000 to design and build interpretation media.

“Indicative costs are becoming available as we move through to more detailed concept plans and early indications show further funding will likely be required to deliver both an iconic bridge to the slipway and the full suite of historical interpretation material.”

A presentation on the interpretations strategy will be made by the Tairawhiti Navigations Governance Group, which includes iwi and the community trust and Historic Places Tairawhiti.

ECT has provided $2.4m for the bridge project, detailed concept plans for which are yet to be developed.

THE go-ahead for three major aspects of the Tairawhiti Navigations Project will be sought from Gisborne District Council tomorrow, including the long-awaited redevelopment of the inner harbour area, although existing funding of $10 million is at least $3.5m short of what is needed for the full projects to be implemented.

Councillors are being asked to approve an historical interpretations strategy, full implementation of which would cost almost $1.5m more than the $1m budgeted — with options down to the remaining budget of $530,000 and less included — and to approve a designer for the Turanganui River bridge project that will link the Waikanae Stream area with the slipway.

The council has been involved in lengthy discussions for years on the inner harbour project, notably with boat owners and Gisborne Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club.

As recently as a month ago the then chief executive Judy Campbell told them no agreement had been reached.

Councillors are being told in a report for tomorrow’s full council meeting that the concept plans for phase one are now ready for a resource consent to be lodged.

Project manager De-Arne Sutherland is recommending that the council adopt option two for the inner harbour project.

One of two options that will be considered, option two would involve full implementation of the project at a cost of $5m. It would involve seeking further external funding to cover a projected $2m shortfall.

The other option would be to reduce the scale and specifications of the project to keep it within budget.

Feedback from ECT

Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann will make a presentation to Eastland Community Trust on May 1 to receive feedback on their funding allocations and preferences.

Phase one of the inner harbour development includes a new pedestrian promenade providing safe access through the inner harbour leading to Titirangi Domain, the central business district, the Oneroa cycle and walkway, and the intended Wainui Road-Rutene Road cycleway.

The Esplanade and Crawford Road will be redeveloped and landscaped with rain gardens to treat stormwater run-off.

There will be a slight increase in parking in The Esplanade, The Works and Soho areas. A new carpark will be formed adjacent to Soho and expansion of The Works carpark will provide fit-for-purpose boat trailer parking. The boat trailer parks are designed so that vehicles can drive in and out, meaning reversing with a trailer will not be needed.

The existing waterfront carparks will remain until phase two of the project is constructed. It is suggested that phase two be consulted on, as part of the long-term plan process, early next year.

Historical interpretations project

The historical interpretations project will involve trail markers, view shafts and the bridge to the slipway, which is the nearest point to where the rock Toka a Taiau, the first formal meeting place between Europeans and Maori in 1769, used to be.

The council is being asked to approve Auckland architects and design firm Monk McKenzie/Navare, one of seven original applicants, as the preferred bridge designer.

The report says the port company has set aside $1.6m for shaping work on the slipway, although it has been told the cost of this is more likely to be $3.9m.

Eastland Port general manager Andrew Gaddum this morning said: “Reshaping the slipway at Eastland Port is budgeted to cost $3.8m and is just one part of a larger project to future-proof the port.”

Councillors are told in the report that the interpretations project has a budget of $1m, secured from Eastland Community Trust. There is a remaining budget of $530,000 to design and build interpretation media.

“Indicative costs are becoming available as we move through to more detailed concept plans and early indications show further funding will likely be required to deliver both an iconic bridge to the slipway and the full suite of historical interpretation material.”

A presentation on the interpretations strategy will be made by the Tairawhiti Navigations Governance Group, which includes iwi and the community trust and Historic Places Tairawhiti.

ECT has provided $2.4m for the bridge project, detailed concept plans for which are yet to be developed.

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