Coast road needs attention

Council told that SH35 should be recognised in Government Policy Statement.

Council told that SH35 should be recognised in Government Policy Statement.

THE importance to the district of State Highway 35 should be recognised in the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport, Gisborne District Council has been told.

The council was asked to approve a draft submission on the policy but some councillors feel it should include more emphasis on State Highway 35.

Brian Wilson said the submission said the district was “really dependent” on SH2 for its economic activity for goods going in and out of the region.

Further down it said that every few years the Waioeka Gorge was closed by slips. The gorge was actually closed on the day of the meeting.

When there was an enormous slip in the gorge a few years ago, SH35 had to be used.

“I am worried that with this submission, resources and money will not be directed to State Highway 35 as our secondary route in and out of the region,” he said.

“The way it is written is to pour all your resources into State Highway 2 and look at the Waioeka Gorge.

“But we know that however much money you spend on it, a slip can come down like the huge one a couple of years ago when we were cut off from that direction.

“I just wonder whether it needs to be worded a little bit to say that State Highway 35 is a viable alternative route for the region and that resources need to be directed there as well.”

Resilience of SH35

Pat Seymour said SH35 was important and she did not know what resources had been directed into it to ensure its resilience.

She would like to know what effort had been put in by Tairawhiti Roads to deal with the washout at Turihaua that had happened three times since September last year.

“In the winter of last year, it pushed a log truck off the road. Somebody could be killed. It came down last week.”

The landowner told her there was a quantity of loose spoil that should be removed.

In other places like Marlborough, they were dropping water bombs on overhangs like this from helicopters.

“Why don’t we look at whether there are some alternatives so that we get rid of that lightweight free material
that comes down every time there is rainfall.”

The government policy statement talked about increasing resilience on critical regional routes. SH35 was one of those.
Bill Burdett said route security was one of the roles allocated to Tairawhiti Roads. When the gorge went out, the alternative was to go through Napier or round the Coast. The vast majority used SH35.

Route security for Gisborne

For Gisborne, route security south was through SH2, north it was SH35.

“We have to make sure they are maintained to a level that they can be used 365 days a year,” he said.

Graeme Thomson said the Wharekopae and Tiniroto roads should also be named in the submission. These were two regional roads that got people to the major transport links.

In Kaikoura after the earthquake, people were allowed to deposit slip material without having to get a resource consent.

At the time of the last major gorge slip, he was one of a group who looked at a bench area where it would have been possible to get a truck through. They were not allowed to do it because of the need for resource consent.

Looking at consenting issues around roading in emergencies would be worth mentioning in the submission.

GDC acting planning and development group manager David Wilson said the comments made could be added to the submission.

THE importance to the district of State Highway 35 should be recognised in the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport, Gisborne District Council has been told.

The council was asked to approve a draft submission on the policy but some councillors feel it should include more emphasis on State Highway 35.

Brian Wilson said the submission said the district was “really dependent” on SH2 for its economic activity for goods going in and out of the region.

Further down it said that every few years the Waioeka Gorge was closed by slips. The gorge was actually closed on the day of the meeting.

When there was an enormous slip in the gorge a few years ago, SH35 had to be used.

“I am worried that with this submission, resources and money will not be directed to State Highway 35 as our secondary route in and out of the region,” he said.

“The way it is written is to pour all your resources into State Highway 2 and look at the Waioeka Gorge.

“But we know that however much money you spend on it, a slip can come down like the huge one a couple of years ago when we were cut off from that direction.

“I just wonder whether it needs to be worded a little bit to say that State Highway 35 is a viable alternative route for the region and that resources need to be directed there as well.”

Resilience of SH35

Pat Seymour said SH35 was important and she did not know what resources had been directed into it to ensure its resilience.

She would like to know what effort had been put in by Tairawhiti Roads to deal with the washout at Turihaua that had happened three times since September last year.

“In the winter of last year, it pushed a log truck off the road. Somebody could be killed. It came down last week.”

The landowner told her there was a quantity of loose spoil that should be removed.

In other places like Marlborough, they were dropping water bombs on overhangs like this from helicopters.

“Why don’t we look at whether there are some alternatives so that we get rid of that lightweight free material
that comes down every time there is rainfall.”

The government policy statement talked about increasing resilience on critical regional routes. SH35 was one of those.
Bill Burdett said route security was one of the roles allocated to Tairawhiti Roads. When the gorge went out, the alternative was to go through Napier or round the Coast. The vast majority used SH35.

Route security for Gisborne

For Gisborne, route security south was through SH2, north it was SH35.

“We have to make sure they are maintained to a level that they can be used 365 days a year,” he said.

Graeme Thomson said the Wharekopae and Tiniroto roads should also be named in the submission. These were two regional roads that got people to the major transport links.

In Kaikoura after the earthquake, people were allowed to deposit slip material without having to get a resource consent.

At the time of the last major gorge slip, he was one of a group who looked at a bench area where it would have been possible to get a truck through. They were not allowed to do it because of the need for resource consent.

Looking at consenting issues around roading in emergencies would be worth mentioning in the submission.

GDC acting planning and development group manager David Wilson said the comments made could be added to the submission.

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