Jail term for attack in neighbour’s bus

Two plead guilty to three charges each.

Two plead guilty to three charges each.

Gisborne Courthouse. File picture

ENTERING a house bus in which a man was sleeping, two people punched him dozens of times and attacked his son with an axe when he came to his father’s aid, Gisborne District Court heard.

Vicky Rose Soloman, 33, and Cyril Kaui, 26, each pleaded guilty to three charges.

Soloman pleaded guilty to charges of injuring with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, assault with a weapon and aggravated burglary.

She appeared for sentencing by Judge Warren Cathcart after she accepted an earlier indicated starting point of 7½ years imprisonment, with discounts totalling 40 percent for her guilty pleas and mitigating factors.

Imposing a three years, nine months jail term, the judge rejected counsel Alistair Clarke’s submissions for discounts beyond that 40 percent.

Kaui entered guilty pleas to wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, assault with a stabbing weapon, and burglary with a weapon.

He accepted a sentence indication of six years’ imprisonment.

He appeared in court via audio-visual link and will appear the same way for formal sentencing on July 28.

Dispute previous day

The court heard the incident on January 2 followed a dispute the previous day between Soloman and the complainant, her neighbour.

“I’ll come back with the Mob and sort you out first,” Soloman warned the man.

True to her word, she returned in the early hours the next morning with a male accomplice.

They entered the man’s house bus through an unlocked sliding door. He was on a bed.

The pair punched him repeatedly on the left side of his head and on his body.

He thought he had been struck 20 to 30 times, the man said.

The blows split open skin on his nose, mouth and forehead, creating open, raised wounds.

The complainant’s son came to his aid but was punched in the mouth by Soloman. An axe was swung at him by the co-offender.

Seeking additional discount for Soloman, Mr Clarke cited her personal circumstances and remorse, which he said went beyond that implicit in her guilty pleas.

Soloman had written to both complainants and the court expressing “genuine remorse”, Mr Clarke said.

The offending was underpinned by a form of post-traumatic stress disorder she suffered as a result of her tragic life circumstances.

She had prior convictions but this was the first time she had engaged properly in dealing with her issues, and started on the road to rehabilitation and recovery, Mr Clarke said.

Judge Cathcart accepted Soloman’s circumstances were tragic but questioned how many times she could use that as an excuse.

He noted a pre-sentence report did not support the proposition of post-traumatic stress disorder.

It referred to her tragic past but said she did not present with any major mental illness. Her personality trait was towards perfectionism and control.

The judge said Soloman’s tragic past and social deprivation was not causative of her offending.

It was difficult to gauge the authenticity of remorse in offenders who faced imprisonment but he accepted Soloman had “gone to some lengths” to express hers.

However, his previous discounts had been generous, the judge said. There was no reason to discount the sentence any further.

ENTERING a house bus in which a man was sleeping, two people punched him dozens of times and attacked his son with an axe when he came to his father’s aid, Gisborne District Court heard.

Vicky Rose Soloman, 33, and Cyril Kaui, 26, each pleaded guilty to three charges.

Soloman pleaded guilty to charges of injuring with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, assault with a weapon and aggravated burglary.

She appeared for sentencing by Judge Warren Cathcart after she accepted an earlier indicated starting point of 7½ years imprisonment, with discounts totalling 40 percent for her guilty pleas and mitigating factors.

Imposing a three years, nine months jail term, the judge rejected counsel Alistair Clarke’s submissions for discounts beyond that 40 percent.

Kaui entered guilty pleas to wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, assault with a stabbing weapon, and burglary with a weapon.

He accepted a sentence indication of six years’ imprisonment.

He appeared in court via audio-visual link and will appear the same way for formal sentencing on July 28.

Dispute previous day

The court heard the incident on January 2 followed a dispute the previous day between Soloman and the complainant, her neighbour.

“I’ll come back with the Mob and sort you out first,” Soloman warned the man.

True to her word, she returned in the early hours the next morning with a male accomplice.

They entered the man’s house bus through an unlocked sliding door. He was on a bed.

The pair punched him repeatedly on the left side of his head and on his body.

He thought he had been struck 20 to 30 times, the man said.

The blows split open skin on his nose, mouth and forehead, creating open, raised wounds.

The complainant’s son came to his aid but was punched in the mouth by Soloman. An axe was swung at him by the co-offender.

Seeking additional discount for Soloman, Mr Clarke cited her personal circumstances and remorse, which he said went beyond that implicit in her guilty pleas.

Soloman had written to both complainants and the court expressing “genuine remorse”, Mr Clarke said.

The offending was underpinned by a form of post-traumatic stress disorder she suffered as a result of her tragic life circumstances.

She had prior convictions but this was the first time she had engaged properly in dealing with her issues, and started on the road to rehabilitation and recovery, Mr Clarke said.

Judge Cathcart accepted Soloman’s circumstances were tragic but questioned how many times she could use that as an excuse.

He noted a pre-sentence report did not support the proposition of post-traumatic stress disorder.

It referred to her tragic past but said she did not present with any major mental illness. Her personality trait was towards perfectionism and control.

The judge said Soloman’s tragic past and social deprivation was not causative of her offending.

It was difficult to gauge the authenticity of remorse in offenders who faced imprisonment but he accepted Soloman had “gone to some lengths” to express hers.

However, his previous discounts had been generous, the judge said. There was no reason to discount the sentence any further.

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