Taking care of the hill’s newest plants

Volunteers maintain plantings on Titirangi and more works planned.

Volunteers maintain plantings on Titirangi and more works planned.

GREEN FINGERS: Many of the trees and shrubs planted last winter on Titirangi suffered during the hot, dry summer. Yesterday a team of volunteers, including pictured from left Pharaoh Wharehinga, Laneah Hawley and Te Rei Forbes, got stuck in to release the remaining plants from weeds and prepare the area for more winter planting. Picture by Liam Clayton
GREEN FINGERS: Gisborne-born Green Party MP Gareth Hughes and Gisborne District Councillor Josh Wharehinga get stuck in during a Volunteer Wednesday session on the Titirangi Restoration Project. “I used to run up this hill as a kid every morning, so it is nice to be giving something back," Mr Hughes said. For more information about upcoming Volunteer Wednesday sessions see the Green Guide. Picture by Liam Clayton

A GROUP of hearty volunteers got stuck into weeding and maintaining new plantings on Titirangi yesterday.

The trees and shrubs were planted last winter on the port side of the hill during a series of school and community planting sessions with Ngati Oneone, as part of a project to restore native bush on the special maunga.

Gisborne District Council project manager Andy Kinsella said many of the new plantings suffered in the near- drought conditions over summer.

They had about a 50 percent survival rate. The ngaio and akeake did well, while the manuka and kanuka struggled.

Yesterday’s work was in preparation for more winter planting. They will put about 300 more plants in this winter.

Green Party MP and East Coast nominee Gareth Hughes was in Gisborne yesterday for his party’s East Coast election campaign launch and joined the volunteer effort to help out.

“I used to run up this hill as a kid every morning, so it is nice to be giving something back.

“This is such a taonga for the entire region. This hill is so special to so many people and I think everyone can get behind the vision of a beautiful hill covered in native bush.”

The volunteer session was part of a monthly series on Kaiti Hill, with the next session on May 17.

They are part of the weekly Volunteer Wednesdays programme, from 10am-12pm, run by GDC, Department of Conservation and Tairawhiti Environment Centre.

The next session will be pest trapping at Waihirere Domain next Wednesday.

Contact programme co-ordinators at volunteer.gisborne@live.com for more information.

A GROUP of hearty volunteers got stuck into weeding and maintaining new plantings on Titirangi yesterday.

The trees and shrubs were planted last winter on the port side of the hill during a series of school and community planting sessions with Ngati Oneone, as part of a project to restore native bush on the special maunga.

Gisborne District Council project manager Andy Kinsella said many of the new plantings suffered in the near- drought conditions over summer.

They had about a 50 percent survival rate. The ngaio and akeake did well, while the manuka and kanuka struggled.

Yesterday’s work was in preparation for more winter planting. They will put about 300 more plants in this winter.

Green Party MP and East Coast nominee Gareth Hughes was in Gisborne yesterday for his party’s East Coast election campaign launch and joined the volunteer effort to help out.

“I used to run up this hill as a kid every morning, so it is nice to be giving something back.

“This is such a taonga for the entire region. This hill is so special to so many people and I think everyone can get behind the vision of a beautiful hill covered in native bush.”

The volunteer session was part of a monthly series on Kaiti Hill, with the next session on May 17.

They are part of the weekly Volunteer Wednesdays programme, from 10am-12pm, run by GDC, Department of Conservation and Tairawhiti Environment Centre.

The next session will be pest trapping at Waihirere Domain next Wednesday.

Contact programme co-ordinators at volunteer.gisborne@live.com for more information.

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