Roads and pest weed worry Tiniroto residents

Residents air concerns at latest council cuppa meeting.

Residents air concerns at latest council cuppa meeting.

MUD on the road, new stock road rules and a native weed that affects honey production were the key issues for Tiniroto raised at a Gisborne District Council “cuppa” community meeting last night.

Resident Steve Jackson told the mayor, council staff and a councillor that tutu (pronounced toot), a native weed poisonous to stock, was now affecting the burgeoning manuka industry.

“It writes off the honey if tutu levels are too high,” Mr Jackson said.

The weed was prevalent in the area.

“Wherever there is a cut-out in the road it grows.”

Expensive to test

It was expensive to test for and they needed to dilute it with other honey if tutu was found in a batch.

Mr Jackson was concerned there was no allowance in the new pest management strategy for spraying
tutu.

Mayor Meng Foon said it had always been around and was not a problem before, but it was a problem now due to the growing honey industry.

Council acting planning and development manager David Wilson said it was also a major issue up the Coast.

Roading was the primary issue for Tiniroto, especially traffic getting past the bluffs to Gisborne.

“No matter how much it rains, it drops mud on the road, then stops commuters getting to work and school in Gisborne,” Mr Jackson said.

Councillor Graeme Thomson said the road was strategic too.

If something happened in the Whareratas, it was the only way through.

MUD on the road, new stock road rules and a native weed that affects honey production were the key issues for Tiniroto raised at a Gisborne District Council “cuppa” community meeting last night.

Resident Steve Jackson told the mayor, council staff and a councillor that tutu (pronounced toot), a native weed poisonous to stock, was now affecting the burgeoning manuka industry.

“It writes off the honey if tutu levels are too high,” Mr Jackson said.

The weed was prevalent in the area.

“Wherever there is a cut-out in the road it grows.”

Expensive to test

It was expensive to test for and they needed to dilute it with other honey if tutu was found in a batch.

Mr Jackson was concerned there was no allowance in the new pest management strategy for spraying
tutu.

Mayor Meng Foon said it had always been around and was not a problem before, but it was a problem now due to the growing honey industry.

Council acting planning and development manager David Wilson said it was also a major issue up the Coast.

Roading was the primary issue for Tiniroto, especially traffic getting past the bluffs to Gisborne.

“No matter how much it rains, it drops mud on the road, then stops commuters getting to work and school in Gisborne,” Mr Jackson said.

Councillor Graeme Thomson said the road was strategic too.

If something happened in the Whareratas, it was the only way through.

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