Long-term challenge for GDC finances

Infrastructure projects will cost up to $200 million over next 30 years.

Infrastructure projects will cost up to $200 million over next 30 years.

File picture

FINDING the money for infrastructure projects that will cost up to $200 million in the next 30 years is going to be a major challenge for Gisborne District Council.

Mayor Meng Foon believes that will include the reticulation of Makaraka and Wainui.

“I would bet my bottom dollar on that,” he said.

Acting planning and development group manager David Wilson gave The Future Tairawhiti committee a review of the finance and infrastructure strategy that would be part of the coming 10-year long-term plan.

Mr Wilson said there were two aspects to the finance and infrastructure strategy, projects that were nice to have and those that were essential.

The strategy was based on a population increase of 3 to 8 percent over 30 years, which would mean another 4000 people.

The plan would have to protect the highly-fertile Poverty Bay Flats, which were a huge economic driver of the district. Every house built there meant valuable land lost.

Mr Foon said the council would need land for sections and it did not want to encroach on the Flats.

Development at Makaraka and Wainui

Development would definitely take place at Makaraka and Wainui, he said.

Bill Burdett said staff should look into what it would cost those communities to reticulate. When he first came on the council, it was estimated to be $4000 a section. The latest figure the council had been given was $26,000.

Pat Seymour said a lot of people had spent money on upgrading their own water supply. The longer the council waited, the more that would be spent on systems that would be replaced by reticulation.

Rehette Stoltz said the council had to make sure its wastewater system could cope with these extra people.

Mr Wilson said the council also had to look at the security of its water supply.

“During the summer months, we are using more and more water and we need to ensure that we have enough water for public and industry use.”

Water metering had resulted in an immediate drop of 20 to 30 percent in other districts.

If Makaraka and Wainui were brought into the town supply, there would not be enough water at Mangapoike.

Te Karaka’s wastewater system

There were issues with Te Karaka’s wastewater system, which would have to be looked at because of the effect on the Waipaoa River, Mr Wilson said.

The other issue that had to be discussed was water supply to rural communities on the Coast and in the west of the district.

Mr Wilson said there were big issues with wastewater. It was about making sure the council could do all the things it needed.

The council knew that forestry harvesting was going to increase. There would be bigger trucks on the road and bridges would have to be replaced to cope with them.

Pat Seymour said the public had an expectation of the level of service they wanted on roads but the level had actually deteriorated.

Mr Burdett said the DrainWise project to prevent waste and surface water from private properties getting into the wastewater system was a critical issue for the region.

Graeme Thomson said the council was facing heavy expenditure for infrastructure in the next 30 years but he believed that people could see the big picture and understand why it was needed.

Mr Wilson said staff would workshop all these issues with the council before preparing a draft consultation document.

FINDING the money for infrastructure projects that will cost up to $200 million in the next 30 years is going to be a major challenge for Gisborne District Council.

Mayor Meng Foon believes that will include the reticulation of Makaraka and Wainui.

“I would bet my bottom dollar on that,” he said.

Acting planning and development group manager David Wilson gave The Future Tairawhiti committee a review of the finance and infrastructure strategy that would be part of the coming 10-year long-term plan.

Mr Wilson said there were two aspects to the finance and infrastructure strategy, projects that were nice to have and those that were essential.

The strategy was based on a population increase of 3 to 8 percent over 30 years, which would mean another 4000 people.

The plan would have to protect the highly-fertile Poverty Bay Flats, which were a huge economic driver of the district. Every house built there meant valuable land lost.

Mr Foon said the council would need land for sections and it did not want to encroach on the Flats.

Development at Makaraka and Wainui

Development would definitely take place at Makaraka and Wainui, he said.

Bill Burdett said staff should look into what it would cost those communities to reticulate. When he first came on the council, it was estimated to be $4000 a section. The latest figure the council had been given was $26,000.

Pat Seymour said a lot of people had spent money on upgrading their own water supply. The longer the council waited, the more that would be spent on systems that would be replaced by reticulation.

Rehette Stoltz said the council had to make sure its wastewater system could cope with these extra people.

Mr Wilson said the council also had to look at the security of its water supply.

“During the summer months, we are using more and more water and we need to ensure that we have enough water for public and industry use.”

Water metering had resulted in an immediate drop of 20 to 30 percent in other districts.

If Makaraka and Wainui were brought into the town supply, there would not be enough water at Mangapoike.

Te Karaka’s wastewater system

There were issues with Te Karaka’s wastewater system, which would have to be looked at because of the effect on the Waipaoa River, Mr Wilson said.

The other issue that had to be discussed was water supply to rural communities on the Coast and in the west of the district.

Mr Wilson said there were big issues with wastewater. It was about making sure the council could do all the things it needed.

The council knew that forestry harvesting was going to increase. There would be bigger trucks on the road and bridges would have to be replaced to cope with them.

Pat Seymour said the public had an expectation of the level of service they wanted on roads but the level had actually deteriorated.

Mr Burdett said the DrainWise project to prevent waste and surface water from private properties getting into the wastewater system was a critical issue for the region.

Graeme Thomson said the council was facing heavy expenditure for infrastructure in the next 30 years but he believed that people could see the big picture and understand why it was needed.

Mr Wilson said staff would workshop all these issues with the council before preparing a draft consultation document.

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