Child safety restraints the focus of a joint scheme

Technicians being trained to teach people how to fit child safety seats.

Technicians being trained to teach people how to fit child safety seats.

NEW technicians are being trained to teach people how to properly fit child safety seats.

Tairawhiti Roads and Turanga Health have teamed up through a scheme to help families get and install suitable child car restraints, and increase the number of qualified restraint technicians in the region.

Tairawhiti Roads road safety educator Dianne Akurangi said that during regular roadside check points organised by Plunket, Tairawhiti Roads, police and Turanga Health staff had “seen it all” when it came to child safety seats.

“A regular theme is children who are too big or too small for their car seats, or where they are buckled in securely but the seat is not securely fitted in the vehicle.

“We are also still seeing children travelling without any restraint.”

Ms Akurangi said while Plunket no longer sold or rented out car seats, Turanga Health had identified 150 Tairawhiti families in need of seats.

The joint partnership would help reduce that number, she said.

“As well as providing seats to families in need we’ll ensure the seat is correctly fitted inside the vehicle and the family is trained and confident in installing their child’s restraint.

“We’ve also engaged a qualified child restraints assessor to provide training to early childhood educators and kaimahi (staff) who work with children.”

Ten people took part in a two-day training course last week.

Newly-qualified technicians will help deliver more community bolting and car restraint clinics at which mechanics will be available to install car seat anchor bolts free of charge.

NEW technicians are being trained to teach people how to properly fit child safety seats.

Tairawhiti Roads and Turanga Health have teamed up through a scheme to help families get and install suitable child car restraints, and increase the number of qualified restraint technicians in the region.

Tairawhiti Roads road safety educator Dianne Akurangi said that during regular roadside check points organised by Plunket, Tairawhiti Roads, police and Turanga Health staff had “seen it all” when it came to child safety seats.

“A regular theme is children who are too big or too small for their car seats, or where they are buckled in securely but the seat is not securely fitted in the vehicle.

“We are also still seeing children travelling without any restraint.”

Ms Akurangi said while Plunket no longer sold or rented out car seats, Turanga Health had identified 150 Tairawhiti families in need of seats.

The joint partnership would help reduce that number, she said.

“As well as providing seats to families in need we’ll ensure the seat is correctly fitted inside the vehicle and the family is trained and confident in installing their child’s restraint.

“We’ve also engaged a qualified child restraints assessor to provide training to early childhood educators and kaimahi (staff) who work with children.”

Ten people took part in a two-day training course last week.

Newly-qualified technicians will help deliver more community bolting and car restraint clinics at which mechanics will be available to install car seat anchor bolts free of charge.

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