Urgent repair planned at river mouth

Resource consent lodged for 130-150 metres of rock revetment at river mouth.

Resource consent lodged for 130-150 metres of rock revetment at river mouth.

The Waipaoa River. File picture

URGENT repair work will be carried out near the Waipaoa River mouth as part of the Waipaoa River Flood Control Scheme upgrade. Rivers, drainage and coastal manager Neil Daykin told GDC’s Future Tairawhiti Committee that a resource consent had been lodged for between 130 and 150 metres of rock revetment at the river mouth on the city side to protect the stopbank from wave erosion.

Tender documents were being prepared for this work to be expedited, if possible, this construction season. A resource consent application for the entire 64 kilometre upgrade will be lodged before June 30. The consent will include borrow areas to excavate material to build the stopbanks and for cycle trails. The borrow areas are the sites used to excavate material to build the stopbanks.

Land purchase and access negotiations have commenced with landowners. The delay in lodging the consent was due to the need to gather further information relating to fish passage aspects of the proposed Freshwater Plan, soil contamination investigations and archaeology, Mr Daykin told the council. There were at least 87 culverts that were likely to require varying degrees of fish passage improvements.

The council is in the second year of a $16 million project that is scheduled to be completed by 2030. As part of the coming long-term plan consultation, the council is considering bringing the project forward to a completion date of 2025. The purpose of the project is to upgrade the scheme to meet the challenge of climate change effects until 2090 and protect the Poverty Bay Flats. When it is completed it will cater for a 100-year return period flood event.

The existing stopbanks will be increased in height by typically 0.6 to 0.9 of a metre and the width of the top of the stopbanks will increase from two metres to four metres. Pat Seymour said the matter of fish passages should not be that hard because work was done during the preparation of the Freshwater Plan. Larry Foster said he regularly surfed in the river mouth area and wondered if there had been any consideration of the effects of wave action and reflection in the strong easterly swells that affected the area.

Mr Daykin said the area being repaired was actually about 100 metres back from the river mouth. Andy Cranston asked if Mr Daykin was comfortable that the more vulnerable areas in the stopbanks would not blow out. Mr Daykin said that was one of the priorities. It was why the work was being done on the eastern side first, the area of highest risk. There was always risk with stopbanks. They were essentially earth dams with a grass cover, he said. In the Edgecumbe flood, a section of flood wall collapsed.

URGENT repair work will be carried out near the Waipaoa River mouth as part of the Waipaoa River Flood Control Scheme upgrade. Rivers, drainage and coastal manager Neil Daykin told GDC’s Future Tairawhiti Committee that a resource consent had been lodged for between 130 and 150 metres of rock revetment at the river mouth on the city side to protect the stopbank from wave erosion.

Tender documents were being prepared for this work to be expedited, if possible, this construction season. A resource consent application for the entire 64 kilometre upgrade will be lodged before June 30. The consent will include borrow areas to excavate material to build the stopbanks and for cycle trails. The borrow areas are the sites used to excavate material to build the stopbanks.

Land purchase and access negotiations have commenced with landowners. The delay in lodging the consent was due to the need to gather further information relating to fish passage aspects of the proposed Freshwater Plan, soil contamination investigations and archaeology, Mr Daykin told the council. There were at least 87 culverts that were likely to require varying degrees of fish passage improvements.

The council is in the second year of a $16 million project that is scheduled to be completed by 2030. As part of the coming long-term plan consultation, the council is considering bringing the project forward to a completion date of 2025. The purpose of the project is to upgrade the scheme to meet the challenge of climate change effects until 2090 and protect the Poverty Bay Flats. When it is completed it will cater for a 100-year return period flood event.

The existing stopbanks will be increased in height by typically 0.6 to 0.9 of a metre and the width of the top of the stopbanks will increase from two metres to four metres. Pat Seymour said the matter of fish passages should not be that hard because work was done during the preparation of the Freshwater Plan. Larry Foster said he regularly surfed in the river mouth area and wondered if there had been any consideration of the effects of wave action and reflection in the strong easterly swells that affected the area.

Mr Daykin said the area being repaired was actually about 100 metres back from the river mouth. Andy Cranston asked if Mr Daykin was comfortable that the more vulnerable areas in the stopbanks would not blow out. Mr Daykin said that was one of the priorities. It was why the work was being done on the eastern side first, the area of highest risk. There was always risk with stopbanks. They were essentially earth dams with a grass cover, he said. In the Edgecumbe flood, a section of flood wall collapsed.

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