Consent needed for emergency Wainui Beach works

Conflict between protection of private property versus protecting the community beach asset.

Conflict between protection of private property versus protecting the community beach asset.

It is suggested that long term, the Wainui community will need to prepare for a managed retreat approach to managing beach erosion. An informal meeting hosted by Gisborne District Council land, rivers and coastal manager Neil Daykin will be held from 5pm to 7pm at the Wainui School hall on Thursday.

A RESOURCE consent application will be lodged soon for emergency works needed at Wainui Beach and the remaining works in the Wainui Beach management strategy.

Rivers, coastal and drainage manager Neil Daykins told the District Council’s environmental planning and regulations committee that during the winter of 2016 a period of erosion led to a private wall collapsing at Wairere Road.

Emergency work to replace the wall cost $28,840. Because of the haste involved in the work, it was not subject to full, structural design and no consideration was made of the fit with the beach management strategy.

All emergency works needed to be consented and an application for a consent was prepared.

Work on the application by consultants indicated the rocks piled behind the wall would need to be removed to gain consent.

The beach management strategy implementation was funded by the 113 beach properties at Wainui, regardless of who the beneficiaries of specific works were.

A resource consent was being sought for implementation of the main components of the strategy in the current financial year. The financial costs of the strategy were not known but were likely to exceed the budgeted costs in the long-term plan.

The issue had been one of very longstanding conflict within the Wainui community, with multiple trips to the Environment Court and, before that, the Planning Tribunal. This was largely because of the conflict between protection of private property versus protecting the community beach asset.

It was proposed to hold a meeting to update the community when the resource consents were lodged.

In light of that, and through community consultation, a focus on softer engineering approaches (sand push-ups) and replacement of only a small number of structures was included in the strategy.

However, there were two locations on the beach — the Hamanatua Stream and Tuahine Point — where a harder engineering process was needed.

2015-25 long-term plan

The 2015-2025 long-term plan included five components of work — Hamanatua groyne strengthening, replacement of the revetment wall between the southern groyne and Tuahine Point, sand push-ups from Murphy Road north to the Hamanatua Stream, maintenance of other existing coastal structures, and clearances of the mouths of the Wainui and Hamanatua streams.

A contract had been let for the Hamanatua Stream groyne strengthening. This was expected to be completed before the end of the financial year.

A resource consent application was being prepared for the implementation of the remaining works, sand push-ups and the Tuahine Crescent revetment wall, as well as the emergency works at Wairere Road.

Engineers’ estimates for the Tuahine Crescent revetment wall were significantly higher than the $155,700 in the budget. The actual costs would not be known until the resource consent was granted.

The cost would probably be double the amount in the budget.

Amber Dunn asked what would happen to the houses north of the revetment wall. Would they just fall in?
Mr Daykin said there were rock and rail irons going in further north.

Rehette Stoltz said it did not make sense that the council was removing the rock from the emergency works. Was there no way it could be left?

Mr Daykin said consulting engineers told him the best option was to remove the rock.

He had inherited this and was not involved in the emergency works. He believed it was a mistake to do the extensive works and he now had to fix the problem.

Amber Dunn said she had spoken to Wainui residents and was involved in the beach management strategy.

She had been waiting for an implementation plan, then this came out which seemed to be a list of ad hoc projects.

Residents were wondering whether this truly honoured the intent of the strategy.

There was likely to be sparks when they went back to the community.

The council won an award for its facilitation of the strategy, it would be nice to continue that, she said.

A RESOURCE consent application will be lodged soon for emergency works needed at Wainui Beach and the remaining works in the Wainui Beach management strategy.

Rivers, coastal and drainage manager Neil Daykins told the District Council’s environmental planning and regulations committee that during the winter of 2016 a period of erosion led to a private wall collapsing at Wairere Road.

Emergency work to replace the wall cost $28,840. Because of the haste involved in the work, it was not subject to full, structural design and no consideration was made of the fit with the beach management strategy.

All emergency works needed to be consented and an application for a consent was prepared.

Work on the application by consultants indicated the rocks piled behind the wall would need to be removed to gain consent.

The beach management strategy implementation was funded by the 113 beach properties at Wainui, regardless of who the beneficiaries of specific works were.

A resource consent was being sought for implementation of the main components of the strategy in the current financial year. The financial costs of the strategy were not known but were likely to exceed the budgeted costs in the long-term plan.

The issue had been one of very longstanding conflict within the Wainui community, with multiple trips to the Environment Court and, before that, the Planning Tribunal. This was largely because of the conflict between protection of private property versus protecting the community beach asset.

It was proposed to hold a meeting to update the community when the resource consents were lodged.

In light of that, and through community consultation, a focus on softer engineering approaches (sand push-ups) and replacement of only a small number of structures was included in the strategy.

However, there were two locations on the beach — the Hamanatua Stream and Tuahine Point — where a harder engineering process was needed.

2015-25 long-term plan

The 2015-2025 long-term plan included five components of work — Hamanatua groyne strengthening, replacement of the revetment wall between the southern groyne and Tuahine Point, sand push-ups from Murphy Road north to the Hamanatua Stream, maintenance of other existing coastal structures, and clearances of the mouths of the Wainui and Hamanatua streams.

A contract had been let for the Hamanatua Stream groyne strengthening. This was expected to be completed before the end of the financial year.

A resource consent application was being prepared for the implementation of the remaining works, sand push-ups and the Tuahine Crescent revetment wall, as well as the emergency works at Wairere Road.

Engineers’ estimates for the Tuahine Crescent revetment wall were significantly higher than the $155,700 in the budget. The actual costs would not be known until the resource consent was granted.

The cost would probably be double the amount in the budget.

Amber Dunn asked what would happen to the houses north of the revetment wall. Would they just fall in?
Mr Daykin said there were rock and rail irons going in further north.

Rehette Stoltz said it did not make sense that the council was removing the rock from the emergency works. Was there no way it could be left?

Mr Daykin said consulting engineers told him the best option was to remove the rock.

He had inherited this and was not involved in the emergency works. He believed it was a mistake to do the extensive works and he now had to fix the problem.

Amber Dunn said she had spoken to Wainui residents and was involved in the beach management strategy.

She had been waiting for an implementation plan, then this came out which seemed to be a list of ad hoc projects.

Residents were wondering whether this truly honoured the intent of the strategy.

There was likely to be sparks when they went back to the community.

The council won an award for its facilitation of the strategy, it would be nice to continue that, she said.

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Dave Peacock - 2 years ago
Full marks to Neil Daykin for bringing this issue to the attention of the council. Failure to remove the unauthorised rock from the foredune will result in "copycat" rock dumping by other beach-front property owners whenever there is a so-called "emergency", as happened in 1992 when unauthorised rock was dumped along the toe of the foredune south of the Stock Route, and is still there today.
The Wainui Beach Management Strategy, which is an agreement between Wainui residents and the wider community, must be rigorously adhered to otherwise there is a real danger that one of New Zealand's most outstanding surf beaches will be trashed.

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