Gisborne doctor in new role supporting health students

Dr Diana Kopua accepts part-time role of Associate Dean, Tairawhiti for University of Otago, Wellington.

Dr Diana Kopua accepts part-time role of Associate Dean, Tairawhiti for University of Otago, Wellington.

Dr Diana Kopua

GISBORNE doctor Diana Kopua has been appointed to the new part-time role of Associate Dean, Tairawhiti for the University of Otago, Wellington.

It involves providing support for all University of Otago students in the Gisborne-Wairoa region.

University of Otago, Wellington Dean and head of campus Professor Sunny Collings says the role is significant.

Dr Kopua will be supporting health professional students from a variety of health disciplines and programmes, as well as making links within the community to foster aspects of workforce development.

Dr Kopua began her career as a nurse working in mental health in Porirua, then trained at the University of Otago in medicine, specialising in psychiatry. She is head of the psychiatry department at Hauora Tairawhiti.

In her new additional role, Dr Kopua will work alongside Dr Patrick McHugh, the academic leader of the Tairawhiti Interprofessional Education (TIPE) programme.

The programme brings together pre-registration students from different health disciplines to learn with, from and about each other as they gain clinical experience in rural New Zealand.

Since 2012, more than 300 final-year dental, dietetic, medical, nursing, occupational therapy, oral health, physiotherapy and pharmacy students have taken part in the TIPE programme.

Students gain their experience working in the Tairawhiti and Wairoa communities, particularly with Maori health service providers, and giving back through community projects.

UOW primary healthcare and general practice department professor Sue Pullon said the TIPE programme provided “wonderful” opportunities for students of different disciplines to learn to work together caring for patients.

“The programme also focuses on learning about rural health, chronic conditions management and hauora Maori.”

GISBORNE doctor Diana Kopua has been appointed to the new part-time role of Associate Dean, Tairawhiti for the University of Otago, Wellington.

It involves providing support for all University of Otago students in the Gisborne-Wairoa region.

University of Otago, Wellington Dean and head of campus Professor Sunny Collings says the role is significant.

Dr Kopua will be supporting health professional students from a variety of health disciplines and programmes, as well as making links within the community to foster aspects of workforce development.

Dr Kopua began her career as a nurse working in mental health in Porirua, then trained at the University of Otago in medicine, specialising in psychiatry. She is head of the psychiatry department at Hauora Tairawhiti.

In her new additional role, Dr Kopua will work alongside Dr Patrick McHugh, the academic leader of the Tairawhiti Interprofessional Education (TIPE) programme.

The programme brings together pre-registration students from different health disciplines to learn with, from and about each other as they gain clinical experience in rural New Zealand.

Since 2012, more than 300 final-year dental, dietetic, medical, nursing, occupational therapy, oral health, physiotherapy and pharmacy students have taken part in the TIPE programme.

Students gain their experience working in the Tairawhiti and Wairoa communities, particularly with Maori health service providers, and giving back through community projects.

UOW primary healthcare and general practice department professor Sue Pullon said the TIPE programme provided “wonderful” opportunities for students of different disciplines to learn to work together caring for patients.

“The programme also focuses on learning about rural health, chronic conditions management and hauora Maori.”

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Maringikura Mary Campbell - 10 days ago
Brilliant news. Someone with a new direction and focus is exactly what is needed to inspire health professionals who will go on to support tangata whaiora offering hope and recovery from a Maori perspective. Te Aroha Te Atua

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