Sunday thunder in the sky over airport

Aircraft lineup includes New Zealand’s only fully operational WW2 Grumman Avenger torpedo bomber.

Aircraft lineup includes New Zealand’s only fully operational WW2 Grumman Avenger torpedo bomber.

HERE SUNDAY: New Zealand’s only fully operational Grumman Avenger, based at Ohakea airbase, will return to Gisborne on Sunday for Gisborne Aviation Preservation Society’s planned “Thunder in the Sky” day. Picture by Gavin Conroy

THE Gisborne Aviation Preservation Society (GAPS) hosts “Thunder in the Sky” this Sunday and the lineup of aircraft includes New Zealand’s only fully operational WW2 Grumman Avenger torpedo bomber.

The Ohakea-based aircraft will fly into Gisborne on Sunday morning from Tauranga between 9.30am and 10am.

30 Squadron of the RNZAF trained on their Grumman aircraft in Gisborne before leaving for the Pacific during WW2.

“Accompanying the Grumman will be seven aircraft from Classic Flyers in Tauranga,” said GAPS spokesman Dick Neill.

“We are not sure at this stage what types of vintage aircraft will be coming from there.”

The GAPS event starts at 9am with the aviation museum’s own Lodestar, DC3 and Tiger moth on display.

“There will be also be vintage cars and bikes, military vehicles and Doug Bell will have his Allison fighter engine on show.

“The visiting aircraft, including the Grumman, will put on aerial handling displays between 12.30pm and 1.30pm over the airport.”

Tours will run of the museum and model hobbyists will have their creations on show.

Mr Neill said good weather was important for the visiting aircraft and at this stage it looks OK.

“The Grumman will be the star of our show.”

The Eastland Group and Farmers Air have supported the aircraft’s visit by meeting the fuel costs involved in getting it here.

The Group has recently become a corporate member of GAPS.

Chief executive Matt Todd said the region has a long and proud aviation history.

“In fact New Zealand’s first commercial flights began here in April 1935, with East Coast Airways starting a regular passenger service between Gisborne and Napier.

“The aviation museum at Gisborne Airport is a bit of a hidden treasure and we are pleased to show our support for a team of incredibly knowledgeable volunteers.”

Mr Neill said it was wonderful news to hear about the Eastland Group support.

“We are very grateful to have Matt and his team on board.”

Mr Todd has encouraged the public to support Sunday’s event.

“It is a chance to experience some of New Zealand’s aviation history for yourselves at Thunder in the Sky.”

THE Gisborne Aviation Preservation Society (GAPS) hosts “Thunder in the Sky” this Sunday and the lineup of aircraft includes New Zealand’s only fully operational WW2 Grumman Avenger torpedo bomber.

The Ohakea-based aircraft will fly into Gisborne on Sunday morning from Tauranga between 9.30am and 10am.

30 Squadron of the RNZAF trained on their Grumman aircraft in Gisborne before leaving for the Pacific during WW2.

“Accompanying the Grumman will be seven aircraft from Classic Flyers in Tauranga,” said GAPS spokesman Dick Neill.

“We are not sure at this stage what types of vintage aircraft will be coming from there.”

The GAPS event starts at 9am with the aviation museum’s own Lodestar, DC3 and Tiger moth on display.

“There will be also be vintage cars and bikes, military vehicles and Doug Bell will have his Allison fighter engine on show.

“The visiting aircraft, including the Grumman, will put on aerial handling displays between 12.30pm and 1.30pm over the airport.”

Tours will run of the museum and model hobbyists will have their creations on show.

Mr Neill said good weather was important for the visiting aircraft and at this stage it looks OK.

“The Grumman will be the star of our show.”

The Eastland Group and Farmers Air have supported the aircraft’s visit by meeting the fuel costs involved in getting it here.

The Group has recently become a corporate member of GAPS.

Chief executive Matt Todd said the region has a long and proud aviation history.

“In fact New Zealand’s first commercial flights began here in April 1935, with East Coast Airways starting a regular passenger service between Gisborne and Napier.

“The aviation museum at Gisborne Airport is a bit of a hidden treasure and we are pleased to show our support for a team of incredibly knowledgeable volunteers.”

Mr Neill said it was wonderful news to hear about the Eastland Group support.

“We are very grateful to have Matt and his team on board.”

Mr Todd has encouraged the public to support Sunday’s event.

“It is a chance to experience some of New Zealand’s aviation history for yourselves at Thunder in the Sky.”

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