Rocket Lab launch delayed again

But lift-off could be on today

But lift-off could be on today

Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket.

ROCKET Lab technicians are hoping it will be a case of third time lucky early this afternoon, when they attempt to make history by launching a rocket from the private launch facility at Mahia.

The aerospace company has scrapped two previous attempts in unsuitable weather on Monday and Tuesday to launch the company’s test rocket “It’s a Test’ from a launch facility at Onenui Station. Rocket Lab chief executive Peter Beck said conditions needed to be perfect for a launch to happen.

“We’ve been able to roll the rocket out to the launch pad, but now we’re waiting for the high-altitude cloud to clear.

“Safety is Rocket Lab’s number one priority and we are following guidelines set by the FAA and NASA around weather and launch safety.

“Current weather conditions put us at risk of what is called triboelectrification.

"This is the build-up of static charge through friction. Ice and other particles in high cloud strike the rocket, transferring electrons (the atomic kind) and building up charge on the surface of the vehicle. This can lead to large voltage potential and encourage electric discharges or lightning, which might affect the avionics onboard.”

Another attempt will be made from 1pm today but the company has until June 2 to launch a rocket in a 10-day window that started on Monday.

ROCKET Lab technicians are hoping it will be a case of third time lucky early this afternoon, when they attempt to make history by launching a rocket from the private launch facility at Mahia.

The aerospace company has scrapped two previous attempts in unsuitable weather on Monday and Tuesday to launch the company’s test rocket “It’s a Test’ from a launch facility at Onenui Station. Rocket Lab chief executive Peter Beck said conditions needed to be perfect for a launch to happen.

“We’ve been able to roll the rocket out to the launch pad, but now we’re waiting for the high-altitude cloud to clear.

“Safety is Rocket Lab’s number one priority and we are following guidelines set by the FAA and NASA around weather and launch safety.

“Current weather conditions put us at risk of what is called triboelectrification.

"This is the build-up of static charge through friction. Ice and other particles in high cloud strike the rocket, transferring electrons (the atomic kind) and building up charge on the surface of the vehicle. This can lead to large voltage potential and encourage electric discharges or lightning, which might affect the avionics onboard.”

Another attempt will be made from 1pm today but the company has until June 2 to launch a rocket in a 10-day window that started on Monday.

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