Rocket Lab debris to disintegrate on re-entry

Sections are jettisoned at high speed and break up on descent.

Sections are jettisoned at high speed and break up on descent.

JETTISONED sections of Rocket Lab’s history-making rocket “It’s a Test’’ are unlikely to turn up on the ground.

Following the world’s first successful space flight from a private launch complex last week, the US-New Zealand aerospace company behind the test launch responded to queries from Mahia residents about what happened to the sections of the 17-metre disposable two-stage rocket.

“As is the case with most launch vehicles, after launch but before reaching orbit, materials from the Electron launch vehicle are jettisoned at high speed (about 8000km an hour) and break up on descent,” a Rocket Lab spokeswoman said.

“The Electron vehicle uses highly-advanced lightweight, efficient materials to minimise the amount jettisoned.”

A total of 25,000 data channels would now be reviewed following the launch.

“Over many weeks, we will work through the 25,000 data channels that were collected during the flight.”

Congratulations on the successful launch were this week still rolling in from across the world.

The New Zealand Space Agency at the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment last week issued a statement congratulating the team at Rocket Lab on the successful launch of their first test rocket into space from Mahia Peninsula.

“The launch is the first visible sign of a space industry in New Zealand. New Zealand is now one of 11 countries currently able to launch satellites into space from their own territory and the first to launch from a fully private orbital launch range.

“The potential benefits for our economy are very significant. These include opportunities to grow in areas related to the space industry, such as research, materials development and testing, and to attract other space-related companies to set up in New Zealand . . . and even space tourism.

“A range of government agencies, led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, is also ensuring launch activities are safe and secure.

“The New Zealand Space Agency is the lead agency for space policy, regulation and business development relating to the use of space from New Zealand.”

The launch made global headlines, with Russia Today, BBC and the LA Times all covering the story, with US broadcaster CNBC hailing the Rocket Lab team as a “new rival for Elon Musk” (founder of Paypal, Telsa Motors and SpaceX).

JETTISONED sections of Rocket Lab’s history-making rocket “It’s a Test’’ are unlikely to turn up on the ground.

Following the world’s first successful space flight from a private launch complex last week, the US-New Zealand aerospace company behind the test launch responded to queries from Mahia residents about what happened to the sections of the 17-metre disposable two-stage rocket.

“As is the case with most launch vehicles, after launch but before reaching orbit, materials from the Electron launch vehicle are jettisoned at high speed (about 8000km an hour) and break up on descent,” a Rocket Lab spokeswoman said.

“The Electron vehicle uses highly-advanced lightweight, efficient materials to minimise the amount jettisoned.”

A total of 25,000 data channels would now be reviewed following the launch.

“Over many weeks, we will work through the 25,000 data channels that were collected during the flight.”

Congratulations on the successful launch were this week still rolling in from across the world.

The New Zealand Space Agency at the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment last week issued a statement congratulating the team at Rocket Lab on the successful launch of their first test rocket into space from Mahia Peninsula.

“The launch is the first visible sign of a space industry in New Zealand. New Zealand is now one of 11 countries currently able to launch satellites into space from their own territory and the first to launch from a fully private orbital launch range.

“The potential benefits for our economy are very significant. These include opportunities to grow in areas related to the space industry, such as research, materials development and testing, and to attract other space-related companies to set up in New Zealand . . . and even space tourism.

“A range of government agencies, led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, is also ensuring launch activities are safe and secure.

“The New Zealand Space Agency is the lead agency for space policy, regulation and business development relating to the use of space from New Zealand.”

The launch made global headlines, with Russia Today, BBC and the LA Times all covering the story, with US broadcaster CNBC hailing the Rocket Lab team as a “new rival for Elon Musk” (founder of Paypal, Telsa Motors and SpaceX).

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