New amenities contractors to start July 1  

Auckland-based company will employ 20 staff locally, 16 from this region.

Auckland-based company will employ 20 staff locally, 16 from this region.

Gisborne Botanic Gardens. Picture by Louis McKenna

THE new main contractor for maintenance and recreation services will employ 20 staff by the time the new contract period begins on July 1, and 16 of those people will be from this region.

Gisborne District Council decided in early May to award the five-year contract to an Auckland-based parks, grounds and facility management company to look after community reserves and amenities.

The contract, now known as the Mahi Mo Te Tairawhiti contract, has mostly been operated by Downer for seven years. There have been about 40 other formal and informal contractors.

The work involves mowing sports grounds and reserves, litter management, public toilet and pavement cleaning, vegetation and building maintenance.

The Herald was told four or five staff at Downer had lost their jobs and now face redundancy because of the contract change.

One or two found other jobs but the rest are apparently still looking for new work.

Majority from local communities

“I can confirm that Recreational Services is employing 20 staff to provide their services here and that 16 of them are employed from our local communities,” said council liveable communities director Andrew White.

“At last report there were still two vacancies for positions on offer, which Recreational Services expected to have filled by the start of the contract on July 1.

“They are subcontracting locally for work, including with our new community caretakers and specialist service providers such as arboricultural services,” Mr White said.

“Also they are developing accounts and relationships with local businesses like those who provide mechanical repairs and supplies required to deliver services.”

Mr White said he was satisifed the transition into the new contract arrangement would be a seamless one, and in some areas he expects to see an immediate improvement in the quality of services provided.

“Most of the previous maintenance contracts were to expire at the end of this month anyway, so this was the right time to review how these services were delivered.

“We have combined a number of services into a smaller number of contracts, to enable clearer expectations on performance by contractors and quality improvement of the services delivered to the community.

“The scope of the contracts has also been increased to include specialist services to sportsgrounds and monitoring camping operations.”

Thorough process

Mr White said the council undertook a thorough tender and procurement process to award the major contract.

“Recreational Services were the strongest applicant in terms of quality and methodology, and showed an understanding and appreciation of our community’s needs and expectations.

“They have met with current local contractors and suppliers to negotiate services and expertise and most of their staff have been employed locally.”

Five local contractors were awarded contracts for community townships, covering roles such as litter control, opening and closing transfer stations, graffiti control, landscaping, parks and reserve mowing, and weed control.

Community caretaker contracts that operated in existing towns were retained.

THE new main contractor for maintenance and recreation services will employ 20 staff by the time the new contract period begins on July 1, and 16 of those people will be from this region.

Gisborne District Council decided in early May to award the five-year contract to an Auckland-based parks, grounds and facility management company to look after community reserves and amenities.

The contract, now known as the Mahi Mo Te Tairawhiti contract, has mostly been operated by Downer for seven years. There have been about 40 other formal and informal contractors.

The work involves mowing sports grounds and reserves, litter management, public toilet and pavement cleaning, vegetation and building maintenance.

The Herald was told four or five staff at Downer had lost their jobs and now face redundancy because of the contract change.

One or two found other jobs but the rest are apparently still looking for new work.

Majority from local communities

“I can confirm that Recreational Services is employing 20 staff to provide their services here and that 16 of them are employed from our local communities,” said council liveable communities director Andrew White.

“At last report there were still two vacancies for positions on offer, which Recreational Services expected to have filled by the start of the contract on July 1.

“They are subcontracting locally for work, including with our new community caretakers and specialist service providers such as arboricultural services,” Mr White said.

“Also they are developing accounts and relationships with local businesses like those who provide mechanical repairs and supplies required to deliver services.”

Mr White said he was satisifed the transition into the new contract arrangement would be a seamless one, and in some areas he expects to see an immediate improvement in the quality of services provided.

“Most of the previous maintenance contracts were to expire at the end of this month anyway, so this was the right time to review how these services were delivered.

“We have combined a number of services into a smaller number of contracts, to enable clearer expectations on performance by contractors and quality improvement of the services delivered to the community.

“The scope of the contracts has also been increased to include specialist services to sportsgrounds and monitoring camping operations.”

Thorough process

Mr White said the council undertook a thorough tender and procurement process to award the major contract.

“Recreational Services were the strongest applicant in terms of quality and methodology, and showed an understanding and appreciation of our community’s needs and expectations.

“They have met with current local contractors and suppliers to negotiate services and expertise and most of their staff have been employed locally.”

Five local contractors were awarded contracts for community townships, covering roles such as litter control, opening and closing transfer stations, graffiti control, landscaping, parks and reserve mowing, and weed control.

Community caretaker contracts that operated in existing towns were retained.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the $6 million proposal for Rugby Park, which includes synthetic turf, an athletics track, additional sportsfield, all-weather sports pavilion and conference/function centre?