Small increase in rates for majority

Average 2 percent increase on the overall rating requirement for 2016/17.

Average 2 percent increase on the overall rating requirement for 2016/17.

MORE than 90 percent of Gisborne ratepayers face an increase of 3 percent or less in the 2017/18 financial year after Gisborne District Council yesterday adopted its annual plan and formally struck the rates that are based on it.

The rates requirement for the year is $54.4 million, which with GST, increases to $62.5 million.

It is an average 2 percent increase on the overall rating requirement for 2016/17.

There is an increase of 0 to 2 percent for 10,577 properties and 2 to 3 percent for another 10,169.

There will be a decrease for 845 properties.

Other property owners face higher increases.

A group of 680 face a 3 to 5 percent rise, 93 will be between 5 and 10 percent, 27 between 10 and 20 percent, and nine are between 20 and 30 percent.

But 53 properties will have a rate increase of 30 percent or more.

The uniform annual general charge for 2017/18 is $686.28.

The uniform general charge must not exceed 30 percent of revenue. This year’s figure sits at 29, thanks to a smoothing practice that has seen the community planning and development package in the general rate increase from 62 to 68 percent.

Larry Foster said he was disappointed that the annual plan included 2013 statistics that showed Gisborne’s population declining.

These were out of date and he would like to see them changed.

Chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said the council was legally obliged to use the latest official census figures.

When the motion to strike the rates was put, Bill Burdett said he would have preferred no increase. Some people were already paying high rates.

The council will consult with the community on Easter trading hours, with a decision to be made in time for Easter Sunday 2018.

It will also consult on an appication to the New Zealand Geographic Board on a dual Maori name to be used alongside Poverty Bay.

Mrs Thatcher Swann said the council was focused on building confidence and better communication and engagement with the communities as it ventured into the next long-term planning phase.

“We are excited to get on with our work and look forward to making in happen in Tairawhiti in the coming financial year.”

MORE than 90 percent of Gisborne ratepayers face an increase of 3 percent or less in the 2017/18 financial year after Gisborne District Council yesterday adopted its annual plan and formally struck the rates that are based on it.

The rates requirement for the year is $54.4 million, which with GST, increases to $62.5 million.

It is an average 2 percent increase on the overall rating requirement for 2016/17.

There is an increase of 0 to 2 percent for 10,577 properties and 2 to 3 percent for another 10,169.

There will be a decrease for 845 properties.

Other property owners face higher increases.

A group of 680 face a 3 to 5 percent rise, 93 will be between 5 and 10 percent, 27 between 10 and 20 percent, and nine are between 20 and 30 percent.

But 53 properties will have a rate increase of 30 percent or more.

The uniform annual general charge for 2017/18 is $686.28.

The uniform general charge must not exceed 30 percent of revenue. This year’s figure sits at 29, thanks to a smoothing practice that has seen the community planning and development package in the general rate increase from 62 to 68 percent.

Larry Foster said he was disappointed that the annual plan included 2013 statistics that showed Gisborne’s population declining.

These were out of date and he would like to see them changed.

Chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said the council was legally obliged to use the latest official census figures.

When the motion to strike the rates was put, Bill Burdett said he would have preferred no increase. Some people were already paying high rates.

The council will consult with the community on Easter trading hours, with a decision to be made in time for Easter Sunday 2018.

It will also consult on an appication to the New Zealand Geographic Board on a dual Maori name to be used alongside Poverty Bay.

Mrs Thatcher Swann said the council was focused on building confidence and better communication and engagement with the communities as it ventured into the next long-term planning phase.

“We are excited to get on with our work and look forward to making in happen in Tairawhiti in the coming financial year.”

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