Gisborne makes it onto wine map

We now have international recognition as a wine region.

We now have international recognition as a wine region.

THE MAP: Geographical indications for New Zealand wine regions. The Gisborne region is based on the Gisborne District Council boundary, which runs from the middle of the Wharerata Hills in the south to East Cape in the north. It includes Motu in the west and Tiniroto to the south-west. The other regions are Northland, Auckland, Matakana, Kumeu, Waiheke Island, Hawke’s Bay, Central Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa, Gladstone, Martinborough, Nelson, Marlborough, Canterbury, North Canterbury, Waipara Valley, Waitaki Valley, North Otago and Central Otago. Map supplied

A LOT of hard work has gone in to the Gisborne district's official international recognition as a wine region.

This week the Geographical Indications (Wines and Spirits) Registration Act 2006 came into force, allowing wine and spirit makers to protect and associate themselves with particular regions.

Gisborne winegrowers president Annie Millton says for the Gisborne region it has been a long time coming and the result of a lot of hard work.

“All committee members helped put together a 96-page document about the district as a wine region including climate, soil types, varieties grown, what varieties stands out, what world recognition this region has had and the history,” she said.

Mrs Millton said Gisborne winemaker Andy Nimmo deserved much credit for getting the document together and delivered on time.

“The passing of this act now means when people are looking at the regions for wine, Gisborne is acknowledged on a world stage.”

Gisborne recognised

Mrs Millton said New Zealand has not had a formal registration system for Geographical Indications in place, but the New Zealand Government has formally recognised Gisborne several times since 1981 where this has been necessary to facilitate exports.

“This provides evidence that the Gisborne GI is already recognised by the New Zealand Government to the extent possible under the current New Zealand law, and that such recognition has been accepted by the governments of other countries,” she said.

Consumer Affairs Minister Jacqui Dean said the new act for geographical indications will help to differentiate New Zealand brands locally and overseas.

“This will also provide a level of assurance that a product is authentic and holds the specific characteristics associated with its origins," Ms Dean said.

“This is a great example of the Government working closely with an important sector to support further growth of exports and jobs for New Zealand."

She said New Zealand wine was a key export.

“Registering a geographical indication differs from registering a trademark. Any trader, who complies with particular geographical indication provisions, is able to use it.

“The Register of Geographical Indications is administered by the Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand (IPONZ). The register is consistent with IPONZ 100 per cent online model, making the process easier and more efficient,” Ms Dean said.

New Zealand Winegrowers chief executive Jeffrey Clarke said it had been a long and sometimes frustrating journey.

“But it’s great to finally reach this point,” he said.

A LOT of hard work has gone in to the Gisborne district's official international recognition as a wine region.

This week the Geographical Indications (Wines and Spirits) Registration Act 2006 came into force, allowing wine and spirit makers to protect and associate themselves with particular regions.

Gisborne winegrowers president Annie Millton says for the Gisborne region it has been a long time coming and the result of a lot of hard work.

“All committee members helped put together a 96-page document about the district as a wine region including climate, soil types, varieties grown, what varieties stands out, what world recognition this region has had and the history,” she said.

Mrs Millton said Gisborne winemaker Andy Nimmo deserved much credit for getting the document together and delivered on time.

“The passing of this act now means when people are looking at the regions for wine, Gisborne is acknowledged on a world stage.”

Gisborne recognised

Mrs Millton said New Zealand has not had a formal registration system for Geographical Indications in place, but the New Zealand Government has formally recognised Gisborne several times since 1981 where this has been necessary to facilitate exports.

“This provides evidence that the Gisborne GI is already recognised by the New Zealand Government to the extent possible under the current New Zealand law, and that such recognition has been accepted by the governments of other countries,” she said.

Consumer Affairs Minister Jacqui Dean said the new act for geographical indications will help to differentiate New Zealand brands locally and overseas.

“This will also provide a level of assurance that a product is authentic and holds the specific characteristics associated with its origins," Ms Dean said.

“This is a great example of the Government working closely with an important sector to support further growth of exports and jobs for New Zealand."

She said New Zealand wine was a key export.

“Registering a geographical indication differs from registering a trademark. Any trader, who complies with particular geographical indication provisions, is able to use it.

“The Register of Geographical Indications is administered by the Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand (IPONZ). The register is consistent with IPONZ 100 per cent online model, making the process easier and more efficient,” Ms Dean said.

New Zealand Winegrowers chief executive Jeffrey Clarke said it had been a long and sometimes frustrating journey.

“But it’s great to finally reach this point,” he said.

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