Gisborne dogs rehomed around NZ

The "Jackson Five".
PUPPY LOVE: Whakatane woman Karen McRobbie (centre) adopted Michael, a fox terrier cross chihuahua, this week through Gisborne charity Mutts and Moggies. Charity secretary Anna Cullingford (left) say 80 percent of dogs they are rehoming are going outside the district. Gisborne District Council animal control team leader Ross Hannam (right) says the partnership with the charity is enabling more dogs to be rehomed. Picture by Liam Clayton
Michael finds a new home.

THE MAJORITY of Gisborne’s rehomed dogs are going out of the district, which those involved say is due to too many dogs here and a greater focus on rehoming.

This week Whakatane woman Karen McRobbie picked up a fox terrier cross chihuahua pup called Michael, one of a litter of five known as “The Jackson Five”.

The five were picked up by Gisborne District Council’s animal control team from an owner who had 13 dogs. Ten of them were given up to the pound.

Ms McRobbie came across Michael through Gisborne charity Mutts and Moggies, which helps rehome suitable dogs from the pound.

She had not been searching long, Some other out-of-town owners had been searching for months.

“We have heard from people in Auckland who have been trying for mon

ths to find a dog in their area,” said Mutts and Moggies secretary Anna Cullingford.

“They are crying when we tell them they can adopt one from here.

“We see so many wonderful dogs in Gisborne put down because nobody wants them.”

Dogs have gone as far north as Whangarei and even down to Twizel in the South Island. Many are rescued dogs, having been through traumatic experiences.

Last year three starved dogs rescued from a property at Ruatoria were found homes by Mutts and Moggies, with two going outside the region.

Mutts and Moggies joined forces with the animal control team in November in a bid to boost the number of dogs rehomed.

“We just catch them and refer dogs to Mutts and Moggies that are suitable to be rehomed,” said animal control team leader Ross Hannam.

“We are only able to do this with volunteers. They are driven by passion for dogs. It would not happen without them.”

Most go out of town

Since the collaboration began, Mutts and Moggies have rehomed 40 dogs and 80 percent of them have gone out of town.

Mr Hannam said the reason could be the greater focus here on rehoming suitable dogs, which was a different approach to some regions.

However, there were also too many dogs in Gisborne and too many irresponsible owners.

“For some owners, if their dog gets taken to the pound it's cheaper for them to go down the road and get another one instead of paying to get it registered, desexed and microchipped.

“There are just so many dogs in Gisborne.”

In the three months to the end of June, 10,766 dogs were registered in the district, and 329 dogs were impounded in that time.

“We strongly urge the Gisborne public to go to the pound if they are interested in a rescued dog,” Ms Cullingford said.

The council has a list on its website with photos.

Mutts and Moggies volunteers collect suitable dogs, clean, de-flea, vaccinate and desex them, then put up advertisements on TradeMe looking for loving new homes.

These costs are reimbursed by the new owners and they also need to arrange for transport for the dogs.

In all, the volunteers spend at least 10 hours per dog, and about another 10 caring for the dog and making sure they find the right owner.

Despite the effort, it is worth it.

“We are a small team driven by a passion to help creatures who cannot help themselves,” Ms Cullingford said.

You can donate to the charity by emailing muttsandmoggiesnz@gmail.com

THE MAJORITY of Gisborne’s rehomed dogs are going out of the district, which those involved say is due to too many dogs here and a greater focus on rehoming.

This week Whakatane woman Karen McRobbie picked up a fox terrier cross chihuahua pup called Michael, one of a litter of five known as “The Jackson Five”.

The five were picked up by Gisborne District Council’s animal control team from an owner who had 13 dogs. Ten of them were given up to the pound.

Ms McRobbie came across Michael through Gisborne charity Mutts and Moggies, which helps rehome suitable dogs from the pound.

She had not been searching long, Some other out-of-town owners had been searching for months.

“We have heard from people in Auckland who have been trying for mon

ths to find a dog in their area,” said Mutts and Moggies secretary Anna Cullingford.

“They are crying when we tell them they can adopt one from here.

“We see so many wonderful dogs in Gisborne put down because nobody wants them.”

Dogs have gone as far north as Whangarei and even down to Twizel in the South Island. Many are rescued dogs, having been through traumatic experiences.

Last year three starved dogs rescued from a property at Ruatoria were found homes by Mutts and Moggies, with two going outside the region.

Mutts and Moggies joined forces with the animal control team in November in a bid to boost the number of dogs rehomed.

“We just catch them and refer dogs to Mutts and Moggies that are suitable to be rehomed,” said animal control team leader Ross Hannam.

“We are only able to do this with volunteers. They are driven by passion for dogs. It would not happen without them.”

Most go out of town

Since the collaboration began, Mutts and Moggies have rehomed 40 dogs and 80 percent of them have gone out of town.

Mr Hannam said the reason could be the greater focus here on rehoming suitable dogs, which was a different approach to some regions.

However, there were also too many dogs in Gisborne and too many irresponsible owners.

“For some owners, if their dog gets taken to the pound it's cheaper for them to go down the road and get another one instead of paying to get it registered, desexed and microchipped.

“There are just so many dogs in Gisborne.”

In the three months to the end of June, 10,766 dogs were registered in the district, and 329 dogs were impounded in that time.

“We strongly urge the Gisborne public to go to the pound if they are interested in a rescued dog,” Ms Cullingford said.

The council has a list on its website with photos.

Mutts and Moggies volunteers collect suitable dogs, clean, de-flea, vaccinate and desex them, then put up advertisements on TradeMe looking for loving new homes.

These costs are reimbursed by the new owners and they also need to arrange for transport for the dogs.

In all, the volunteers spend at least 10 hours per dog, and about another 10 caring for the dog and making sure they find the right owner.

Despite the effort, it is worth it.

“We are a small team driven by a passion to help creatures who cannot help themselves,” Ms Cullingford said.

You can donate to the charity by emailing muttsandmoggiesnz@gmail.com

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