Peters preferred PM in biggest response to a Herald webpoll

NEW Zealand First leader Winston Peters has come out on top in The Gisborne Herald’s online webpoll that asked readers to vote for their preferred prime minister.

Of the options of Bill English, Jacinda Ardern, Winston Peters or Other, Mr Peters had a convincing win, with 42 percent (403) of the 953 votes — the highest number of votes recorded for a Gisborne Herald webpoll.

Current Prime Minister and National Party leader Bill English was second with 30 percent (280 votes), while new Labour leader Jacinda Ardern, who has been riding a wave of “Jacindamania” , came third with 25 percent (240 votes).

Just 3 percent of respondents (30) voted for Other, with respondents naming an even spread of Green Party politicians Gareth Hughes and ex-co-leader Metiria Turei, who resigned on Wednesday, ACT party leader David Seymour and Maori Party co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell.

With Mr Peters regularly polling around 10 percent in national polls for preferred prime minister, the result and high number of votes suggests there was a campaign to manipulate the vote.

Daily vote data shows him leading with fairly consistent margins, aside from Monday and Tuesday when his vote dropped right off. It ramped up to 161 out of 262 votes (63 percent) on Thursday.

Of the 44 comments, 17 were in favour of Mr Peters.

One respondent summed up the general theme of comments.

“Winston’s popularity in the provinces, with the ever-increasing number of superannuants and with Maori, should not be ignored.”

Many voters said he was the most dedicated leader to regional development.

“Winston Peters is the only one who actively supports regional development, which we desperately need,” one person said.

“The forgotten provinces for the last 20 years are about to deservedly give Labour and National a huge boost for Winston,” said another.

“Winston heads the only party which promises to sort out Gisborne’s development of rail, roading and employment,” another said.

Some felt it was time the country had a Maori leader.

“Winston Peters for New Zealand’s first Maori prime minister.”

Others saw him as a reluctant option.

“Disaster for National and Jacinda is just too inexperienced for prime minister.”

Mr English was the subject of eight comments, all referring to his experience and financial expertise.

“As Finance Minister and now as prime minister, Bill English has the experience and results to continue as prime minister,” one person said.

The general theme from the seven comments for Ms Ardern were around her energy and new ideas.

“She is energised, vibrant and ready to look at the important issues effecting heath, housing and education,” one respondent said.

Another said: “A young lady, with vibrance and forward-thinking.”

One commenter focused on her people skills.

“Time for a fresh face, change and someone who values people.”

Some of those who voted Other and did not list a politician appeared dissatisfied with politics in general.

“It’s a sad indictment of politics when this is the best you can come up with,” said one.

“I don’t want an alternative government but an alternative to government,” another said.

NEW Zealand First leader Winston Peters has come out on top in The Gisborne Herald’s online webpoll that asked readers to vote for their preferred prime minister.

Of the options of Bill English, Jacinda Ardern, Winston Peters or Other, Mr Peters had a convincing win, with 42 percent (403) of the 953 votes — the highest number of votes recorded for a Gisborne Herald webpoll.

Current Prime Minister and National Party leader Bill English was second with 30 percent (280 votes), while new Labour leader Jacinda Ardern, who has been riding a wave of “Jacindamania” , came third with 25 percent (240 votes).

Just 3 percent of respondents (30) voted for Other, with respondents naming an even spread of Green Party politicians Gareth Hughes and ex-co-leader Metiria Turei, who resigned on Wednesday, ACT party leader David Seymour and Maori Party co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell.

With Mr Peters regularly polling around 10 percent in national polls for preferred prime minister, the result and high number of votes suggests there was a campaign to manipulate the vote.

Daily vote data shows him leading with fairly consistent margins, aside from Monday and Tuesday when his vote dropped right off. It ramped up to 161 out of 262 votes (63 percent) on Thursday.

Of the 44 comments, 17 were in favour of Mr Peters.

One respondent summed up the general theme of comments.

“Winston’s popularity in the provinces, with the ever-increasing number of superannuants and with Maori, should not be ignored.”

Many voters said he was the most dedicated leader to regional development.

“Winston Peters is the only one who actively supports regional development, which we desperately need,” one person said.

“The forgotten provinces for the last 20 years are about to deservedly give Labour and National a huge boost for Winston,” said another.

“Winston heads the only party which promises to sort out Gisborne’s development of rail, roading and employment,” another said.

Some felt it was time the country had a Maori leader.

“Winston Peters for New Zealand’s first Maori prime minister.”

Others saw him as a reluctant option.

“Disaster for National and Jacinda is just too inexperienced for prime minister.”

Mr English was the subject of eight comments, all referring to his experience and financial expertise.

“As Finance Minister and now as prime minister, Bill English has the experience and results to continue as prime minister,” one person said.

The general theme from the seven comments for Ms Ardern were around her energy and new ideas.

“She is energised, vibrant and ready to look at the important issues effecting heath, housing and education,” one respondent said.

Another said: “A young lady, with vibrance and forward-thinking.”

One commenter focused on her people skills.

“Time for a fresh face, change and someone who values people.”

Some of those who voted Other and did not list a politician appeared dissatisfied with politics in general.

“It’s a sad indictment of politics when this is the best you can come up with,” said one.

“I don’t want an alternative government but an alternative to government,” another said.

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