Satisfaction with GDC up

THE annual residents’ satisfaction survey has given Gisborne District Council a slightly more favourable satisfaction report from residents this year, but the roading network and the value for money aspects have the lowest returns.

The results of the survey, which has a margin of error of 4.8 percent, were presented to the council by performance manager Harvey Dibble.

Residents were reasonably satisfied with 60 percent rating the council’s overall performance as good, an increase of 7 percent on last year’s survey which reflected higher scores in the areas of the mayor and councillors the council.

The highest satisfaction response was the one for overall satisfaction with the water supply system (87 percent) followed by the maintenance of parks, reserves and open spaces (81 percent).

Waste disposal services had a satisfaction level of 77 percent and other council facilities 75 percent.

The only negative response was for overall value for money which was 49 percent although that was 9 percent more than last year.

Value for money was having more influence on the overall satisfaction result than in the past and as measures related to that remained low relative to other areas, the survey showed.

Value for money perceptions were lowest in the Tawhiti-Uawa and Matakaoa-Waiapu Wards.

The council should consider opportunities to demonstrate the value residents received in return for their rates and other fees.

Roads, footpaths and cycleways

The next lowest response was overall satisfaction with roads, footpaths and cycleways at 59 percent, 1 percent up on 2016.

Although the performance in relation to roading was considered acceptable, some aspects had been identified for attention such as cycle safety and the condition of rural roads with 31 percent rating cycle safety as poor. This was an area that warranted further investigation

The overall performance of the mayor and councillors was 62 percent, up 6 percent.

Almost half (47 percent) of residents were “champions” who viewed the council as competent and had a positive emotional connection with the council. Sceptics numbered 36 percent.

Maori and the younger and older age groups were more likely to be champions than the 30-49 age group of which 42 percent were sceptics.

The district’s public facilities rated highly (75 percent), particularly the library and cultural facilities, the Lawson Field Theatre, the War Memorial Theatre and the Tairawhiti Museum.

Residents were mostly satisfied with regulatory services provided, but about a quarter expressed dissatisfaction with the issuing of resource consents and this area might warrant investigation to determine whether there were underlying issues requiring attention.

The council communication with the community attracted 61 percent approval, up 5 percent.

The Gisborne Herald (43 percent) remained the biggest single source of information for the public followed by the council’s web page (22 percent), Facebook (11) and council publications (10).

Close to half local residents had an interaction with the council during the year with most (59 percent) by telephone.

Satisfaction with how enquiries were handled was high, and this was most influenced by the outcome and by the efficiency of the process. The council needed to maintain its performance on these key elements of the service.

About 400 telephone interviews, spread over four quarters, were conducted for the survey.

Some councillors expressed doubts about landlines being used for the survey, saying there was a sector of the community that used only cellphones.

THE annual residents’ satisfaction survey has given Gisborne District Council a slightly more favourable satisfaction report from residents this year, but the roading network and the value for money aspects have the lowest returns.

The results of the survey, which has a margin of error of 4.8 percent, were presented to the council by performance manager Harvey Dibble.

Residents were reasonably satisfied with 60 percent rating the council’s overall performance as good, an increase of 7 percent on last year’s survey which reflected higher scores in the areas of the mayor and councillors the council.

The highest satisfaction response was the one for overall satisfaction with the water supply system (87 percent) followed by the maintenance of parks, reserves and open spaces (81 percent).

Waste disposal services had a satisfaction level of 77 percent and other council facilities 75 percent.

The only negative response was for overall value for money which was 49 percent although that was 9 percent more than last year.

Value for money was having more influence on the overall satisfaction result than in the past and as measures related to that remained low relative to other areas, the survey showed.

Value for money perceptions were lowest in the Tawhiti-Uawa and Matakaoa-Waiapu Wards.

The council should consider opportunities to demonstrate the value residents received in return for their rates and other fees.

Roads, footpaths and cycleways

The next lowest response was overall satisfaction with roads, footpaths and cycleways at 59 percent, 1 percent up on 2016.

Although the performance in relation to roading was considered acceptable, some aspects had been identified for attention such as cycle safety and the condition of rural roads with 31 percent rating cycle safety as poor. This was an area that warranted further investigation

The overall performance of the mayor and councillors was 62 percent, up 6 percent.

Almost half (47 percent) of residents were “champions” who viewed the council as competent and had a positive emotional connection with the council. Sceptics numbered 36 percent.

Maori and the younger and older age groups were more likely to be champions than the 30-49 age group of which 42 percent were sceptics.

The district’s public facilities rated highly (75 percent), particularly the library and cultural facilities, the Lawson Field Theatre, the War Memorial Theatre and the Tairawhiti Museum.

Residents were mostly satisfied with regulatory services provided, but about a quarter expressed dissatisfaction with the issuing of resource consents and this area might warrant investigation to determine whether there were underlying issues requiring attention.

The council communication with the community attracted 61 percent approval, up 5 percent.

The Gisborne Herald (43 percent) remained the biggest single source of information for the public followed by the council’s web page (22 percent), Facebook (11) and council publications (10).

Close to half local residents had an interaction with the council during the year with most (59 percent) by telephone.

Satisfaction with how enquiries were handled was high, and this was most influenced by the outcome and by the efficiency of the process. The council needed to maintain its performance on these key elements of the service.

About 400 telephone interviews, spread over four quarters, were conducted for the survey.

Some councillors expressed doubts about landlines being used for the survey, saying there was a sector of the community that used only cellphones.

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