Construction consented, designs under way

A resource consent for the first stage of the inner harbour upgrade is a major step forward for the Tairawhiti Navigations Project, says Gisborne District Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann.

The inner harbour will be one of the key hubs for the navigations experience she says.

“It will be a transitional space where visitors and the community will be drawn to, connected through improved walkways and heritage trail, connecting Oneroa to Titirangi and the Cook Landing Site.”

Features of the inner harbour upgrade will include a reinvigorated esplanade walkway, which will incorporate green spaces filled with native plants, trees and better accessibility for pedestrians and cyclists.

There will be more furniture, upgraded parking facilities and improved lighting.

The possibility of pedestrian improvements to the Gladstone Road Bridge could also provide safer access to the CBD, and the city’s cycle and walkway network.

Harbourside restaurant owner Grant Fussell is excited about the rejuvenation of Gisborne’s very own ‘viaduct’.

“I see the area being a multi-purpose destination and the home of Gisborne’s finest hospitality.”

The granting of the consent is part of significant advances that have been made towards completing the navigations project by 2019, says Ms Thatcher Swann.

“The Titirangi Restoration Project has completed phase one of replanting, including the port side and the pine harvested areas, with the help of the community through the Titirangi Guardians programme and the support of DoC, Ngati Oneone and other agencies.

“Detailed designs for the inner harbour and the historical interpretations are well under way and resource consent has now been granted for the initial inner harbour work, with construction starting in early 2018.

“We have also developed the Turanganui bridge concept plans, endorsed by the Navigations Governance Group in July.

“It’s great to see the projects moving forward with key stakeholder support. We have made some really good progress on how we will showcase Gisborne as a great place to visit, to tell our stories and celebrate our cultural heritage for the Sestercentennial Commemorations in 2019”.

Working with iwi and DoC

“We know we’ll need some additional funding for the Turanganui bridge project, but will not be clear on costs until we move through the design stage.

“However, we know that the Turanganui bridge is likely to be a longer-term project, given its complexity, the potential costs and resource consenting processes.”

“There’s a lot of interest from outside of Gisborne too, along with government agencies such as the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, wanting to support us with funding applications to MBiE.

“DoC is working in partnership with the council and Ngati Oneone, and is also contributing substantial funds to the Cook Landing Site project,”

“Although the projects will deliver a ‘local voice’ they are of national significance, so the level of interest and support from outside is not surprising,”

In April, the community representatives on the Navigations Group and the council representatives approved the full suite of historical interpretations. This includes 10 trail markers, two view shafts, digital media and website capabilities — “it’s these stories that will bring navigations to life,” says Ms Thatcher Swann.

At its July meeting, the Governance Group endorsed the Turanganui bridge concept plans and the inclusion of the Cook Landing Site upgrade project as part of navigations delivery, in partnership with Ngati Oneone and DoC.

“The council has also asked us to get a clearer idea for the observatory, with star park project costs.

“The success of what we are doing will only be possible through the unwavering support of our community, iwi and funders,” said Ms Thatcher Swann.

“The pieces are all coming together, and the community will soon be able to experience it for themselves,” says Ms Thatcher Swann.

“Tairawhiti Navigations has been in development for a long time now (12 years). This summer we’ll start seeing it come to life.”

Gisborne District Council has committed $5.3 million and Eastland Community Trust $3.4 million to the navigations project. The government will contribute $1.4 million for the Cook Landing Site.

The project consists of the Titirangi Restoration ($1.3 m), inner harbour ($3.7m), Turanganui footbridge and slipway ($1.1 m of ECT funding), historic interpretations ($2.3 m, ECT funding), Cook landing site ($1.4m central government funding).”

A resource consent for the first stage of the inner harbour upgrade is a major step forward for the Tairawhiti Navigations Project, says Gisborne District Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann.

The inner harbour will be one of the key hubs for the navigations experience she says.

“It will be a transitional space where visitors and the community will be drawn to, connected through improved walkways and heritage trail, connecting Oneroa to Titirangi and the Cook Landing Site.”

Features of the inner harbour upgrade will include a reinvigorated esplanade walkway, which will incorporate green spaces filled with native plants, trees and better accessibility for pedestrians and cyclists.

There will be more furniture, upgraded parking facilities and improved lighting.

The possibility of pedestrian improvements to the Gladstone Road Bridge could also provide safer access to the CBD, and the city’s cycle and walkway network.

Harbourside restaurant owner Grant Fussell is excited about the rejuvenation of Gisborne’s very own ‘viaduct’.

“I see the area being a multi-purpose destination and the home of Gisborne’s finest hospitality.”

The granting of the consent is part of significant advances that have been made towards completing the navigations project by 2019, says Ms Thatcher Swann.

“The Titirangi Restoration Project has completed phase one of replanting, including the port side and the pine harvested areas, with the help of the community through the Titirangi Guardians programme and the support of DoC, Ngati Oneone and other agencies.

“Detailed designs for the inner harbour and the historical interpretations are well under way and resource consent has now been granted for the initial inner harbour work, with construction starting in early 2018.

“We have also developed the Turanganui bridge concept plans, endorsed by the Navigations Governance Group in July.

“It’s great to see the projects moving forward with key stakeholder support. We have made some really good progress on how we will showcase Gisborne as a great place to visit, to tell our stories and celebrate our cultural heritage for the Sestercentennial Commemorations in 2019”.

Working with iwi and DoC

“We know we’ll need some additional funding for the Turanganui bridge project, but will not be clear on costs until we move through the design stage.

“However, we know that the Turanganui bridge is likely to be a longer-term project, given its complexity, the potential costs and resource consenting processes.”

“There’s a lot of interest from outside of Gisborne too, along with government agencies such as the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, wanting to support us with funding applications to MBiE.

“DoC is working in partnership with the council and Ngati Oneone, and is also contributing substantial funds to the Cook Landing Site project,”

“Although the projects will deliver a ‘local voice’ they are of national significance, so the level of interest and support from outside is not surprising,”

In April, the community representatives on the Navigations Group and the council representatives approved the full suite of historical interpretations. This includes 10 trail markers, two view shafts, digital media and website capabilities — “it’s these stories that will bring navigations to life,” says Ms Thatcher Swann.

At its July meeting, the Governance Group endorsed the Turanganui bridge concept plans and the inclusion of the Cook Landing Site upgrade project as part of navigations delivery, in partnership with Ngati Oneone and DoC.

“The council has also asked us to get a clearer idea for the observatory, with star park project costs.

“The success of what we are doing will only be possible through the unwavering support of our community, iwi and funders,” said Ms Thatcher Swann.

“The pieces are all coming together, and the community will soon be able to experience it for themselves,” says Ms Thatcher Swann.

“Tairawhiti Navigations has been in development for a long time now (12 years). This summer we’ll start seeing it come to life.”

Gisborne District Council has committed $5.3 million and Eastland Community Trust $3.4 million to the navigations project. The government will contribute $1.4 million for the Cook Landing Site.

The project consists of the Titirangi Restoration ($1.3 m), inner harbour ($3.7m), Turanganui footbridge and slipway ($1.1 m of ECT funding), historic interpretations ($2.3 m, ECT funding), Cook landing site ($1.4m central government funding).”

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