Working out with te reo in the crossfit gym

LIFTING FOR TE REO MAORI: Gisborne crossfit athlete Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont is celebrating Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori by sharing some kupu (words) relating to crossfit. Here he is performing a “hikirua”, a clean and jerk. Picture by Paul Rickard

GISBORNE crossfit athlete Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont may be one of the fittest teenagers on the planet, but he also likes to champion for another cause, te reo Maori.

Tuteari, 14, placed 10th in his age group at the world 2017 Reebok Crossfit Games in Michigan, Wisconsin, in July, and was most likely the only te reo Maori speaker at the games.

With this week being Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori, Tuteari shared some kupu (words) that relate to crossfit at his local gym Crossfit 4010.

Some of the kupu include “pei ake” for push-up, “poho tu” for burpee and “hikirua” for a clean and jerk.

“These kupu are great. They are really simple but explain the exercises really well,” said Tuteari.

“I’m grateful to Crossfit 4010 and my coach Darryn White for being able to share these kupu here at the gym.

“It’s great that they are embracing te reo Maori, especially with this week being Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori.

“Also, thank you to Matua Basil Morgan for coming up with these kupu and sharing them with me, so I can share them with others.

“I’m really glad to be able to share these kupu because it’s cool to have te reo spoken in the gym.”

Tuteari attended Gisborne total immersion Maori language school Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui for his primary education. He acknowledges how fortunate he is to have had that opportunity.

“My siblings and I can all speak te reo Maori. We are really lucky to have been brought up in kura kaupapa. It’s sad hearing the stories about my Nan and how she wasn’t allowed to speak Maori in school.

“We had great tipuna and just to hear about what they went through and how some of them don’t have the reo any more because of that, is sad.”

Tuteari believes that being bilingual and multilingual can only be beneficial and he gave a few words of advice for the community.

“It’s cool having multiple languages. I’m really grateful that I have my reo. It feels special,” he said.

“If you want to learn it, don’t be afraid to approach people that do have it.”

Keep an eye on the Gisborne Herald Facebook page for a video of Tuteari sharing and demonstrating the crossfit kupu.

GISBORNE crossfit athlete Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont may be one of the fittest teenagers on the planet, but he also likes to champion for another cause, te reo Maori.

Tuteari, 14, placed 10th in his age group at the world 2017 Reebok Crossfit Games in Michigan, Wisconsin, in July, and was most likely the only te reo Maori speaker at the games.

With this week being Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori, Tuteari shared some kupu (words) that relate to crossfit at his local gym Crossfit 4010.

Some of the kupu include “pei ake” for push-up, “poho tu” for burpee and “hikirua” for a clean and jerk.

“These kupu are great. They are really simple but explain the exercises really well,” said Tuteari.

“I’m grateful to Crossfit 4010 and my coach Darryn White for being able to share these kupu here at the gym.

“It’s great that they are embracing te reo Maori, especially with this week being Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori.

“Also, thank you to Matua Basil Morgan for coming up with these kupu and sharing them with me, so I can share them with others.

“I’m really glad to be able to share these kupu because it’s cool to have te reo spoken in the gym.”

Tuteari attended Gisborne total immersion Maori language school Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui for his primary education. He acknowledges how fortunate he is to have had that opportunity.

“My siblings and I can all speak te reo Maori. We are really lucky to have been brought up in kura kaupapa. It’s sad hearing the stories about my Nan and how she wasn’t allowed to speak Maori in school.

“We had great tipuna and just to hear about what they went through and how some of them don’t have the reo any more because of that, is sad.”

Tuteari believes that being bilingual and multilingual can only be beneficial and he gave a few words of advice for the community.

“It’s cool having multiple languages. I’m really grateful that I have my reo. It feels special,” he said.

“If you want to learn it, don’t be afraid to approach people that do have it.”

Keep an eye on the Gisborne Herald Facebook page for a video of Tuteari sharing and demonstrating the crossfit kupu.

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