Partnership school planned for Gisborne in 2019

A PARTNERSHIP school for Gisborne has been announced and the school, Turanga Tangata Rite, will be ready to open in 2019.

Turanga Ararau human resources manager Joelene Takai says the planning stage has been completed and the implementation phase is now under way.

The Ministry of Education has confirmed the Government has allocated $6.7 million to Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa for the establishment period and the first six-year term.

Mrs Takai said the partnership school’s location has not been announced but a high percentage of the learning will be offsite, including on marae.

The Gisborne school will be sponsored by Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa and will focus on Maori students.

It is not a private school but collectively owned by the iwi of Turanganui a Kiwa, with a ‘by iwi, for iwi’ approach.

“Our target group will be taiohi (youth) who require alternative educational opportunities that the partnership school concept offers. Planned roll numbers are low, with a maximum of 56 determined on need," Mrs Takai said.

“This is deliberate, as we clearly do not want to compete with our local schools for students who are disengaged from learning.

“Turanga Tangata Rite will be a unique, iwi-driven and responsive school covering Years 9 to 11.

“The curriculum will include STE(A)M (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) subjects to enable learners to reach their full potential, positively contribute to their communities, know and be proud of their cultural identity and be well prepared to pursue their chosen careers.

“On leaving us, our students will have as a minimum NCEA Level 1 and be assisted to transition to high school to complete NCEA Levels 2 and 3, then to higher learning or to tertiary programmes to complete industry qualifications though full-time study or apprenticeships if going into employment.”

One of four new schools

Turanga Tangata Rite will be one of four new partnership schools the Government announced last week. The others will be in central Auckland, South Auckland and Christchurch.

They will join 10 existing partnership schools, plus two to open next year.

“The growth of the partnership schools/kura hourua policy has been significant,” said under-secretary to the Minister of Education David Seymour.

“Partnership schools are well placed to provide STEM-focused education because of their high degree of flexibility.

“They can hire scientists and other STEM experts, and have flexibility in setting remuneration for STEM teachers.

“STEM subjects are vital to improving economic and social outcomes for New Zealanders, and help address labour market needs and foster innovation.”

Mr Seymour said existing partnership schools had been successful in offering educational alternatives to students under-served by the state system. About 1200 students attend partnership schools in New Zealand.

The Post Primary Teachers Association does not agree and believes new charter schools demonstrate a scourge of ideology over evidence.

PPTA view

PPTA president Jack Boyle said the new charter schools in central and south Auckland, Gisborne and Christchurch would affect all the school communities around them by taking money, teachers and children away from other schools.

“Opening charter schools is not going to raise the achievement of our children. It’s not going to close any gaps. It’s not going to level any playing fields," he said.

"The only thing charter schools do successfully is reward mediocrity by using scarce education money to prop up private owners.”

A PARTNERSHIP school for Gisborne has been announced and the school, Turanga Tangata Rite, will be ready to open in 2019.

Turanga Ararau human resources manager Joelene Takai says the planning stage has been completed and the implementation phase is now under way.

The Ministry of Education has confirmed the Government has allocated $6.7 million to Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa for the establishment period and the first six-year term.

Mrs Takai said the partnership school’s location has not been announced but a high percentage of the learning will be offsite, including on marae.

The Gisborne school will be sponsored by Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa and will focus on Maori students.

It is not a private school but collectively owned by the iwi of Turanganui a Kiwa, with a ‘by iwi, for iwi’ approach.

“Our target group will be taiohi (youth) who require alternative educational opportunities that the partnership school concept offers. Planned roll numbers are low, with a maximum of 56 determined on need," Mrs Takai said.

“This is deliberate, as we clearly do not want to compete with our local schools for students who are disengaged from learning.

“Turanga Tangata Rite will be a unique, iwi-driven and responsive school covering Years 9 to 11.

“The curriculum will include STE(A)M (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) subjects to enable learners to reach their full potential, positively contribute to their communities, know and be proud of their cultural identity and be well prepared to pursue their chosen careers.

“On leaving us, our students will have as a minimum NCEA Level 1 and be assisted to transition to high school to complete NCEA Levels 2 and 3, then to higher learning or to tertiary programmes to complete industry qualifications though full-time study or apprenticeships if going into employment.”

One of four new schools

Turanga Tangata Rite will be one of four new partnership schools the Government announced last week. The others will be in central Auckland, South Auckland and Christchurch.

They will join 10 existing partnership schools, plus two to open next year.

“The growth of the partnership schools/kura hourua policy has been significant,” said under-secretary to the Minister of Education David Seymour.

“Partnership schools are well placed to provide STEM-focused education because of their high degree of flexibility.

“They can hire scientists and other STEM experts, and have flexibility in setting remuneration for STEM teachers.

“STEM subjects are vital to improving economic and social outcomes for New Zealanders, and help address labour market needs and foster innovation.”

Mr Seymour said existing partnership schools had been successful in offering educational alternatives to students under-served by the state system. About 1200 students attend partnership schools in New Zealand.

The Post Primary Teachers Association does not agree and believes new charter schools demonstrate a scourge of ideology over evidence.

PPTA view

PPTA president Jack Boyle said the new charter schools in central and south Auckland, Gisborne and Christchurch would affect all the school communities around them by taking money, teachers and children away from other schools.

“Opening charter schools is not going to raise the achievement of our children. It’s not going to close any gaps. It’s not going to level any playing fields," he said.

"The only thing charter schools do successfully is reward mediocrity by using scarce education money to prop up private owners.”

What are Partnership Schools?

Partnership schools or kura hourua are a new way of delivering public education. Their specific purpose is to enable New Zealand’s most disadvantaged students to achieve greater educational success.

The concept represents an opportunity for communities, iwi, philanthropists and business organisations to partner with educators to raise achievement for disadvantaged students. The schools contract with the Government to meet specified, rigorous educational standards in return for greater freedom to innovate to do so.

Unlike regular state schools, whose relationship with the Crown is based on regulation, these schools are accountable to the Crown through a binding, legally enforceable, fixed-term contract to meet specific, measurable educational performance goals.

The schools have greater freedom in school organisation, employment arrangements, curriculum, and teaching methods and practices.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you think tension between North Korea and USA will escalate to military conflict?