Costs mount on Stafford St slump

Work in progress at the Stafford Street footpath slip. Picture by Liam Clayton

THE cost of a new length of footpath and rail installed in March this year where Riverside Road becomes Stafford Street is growing.

The path was undermined soon after it was installed. In March a new rail was added to a section of the footpath near the Russell Street intersection and the footpath was extended into Stafford Street at a cost of $41,000.

In May the hill under the riverside footpath slumped after severe weather, leaving the footpath hanging on the edge for about 60 metres.

The road was reduced to one lane and drivers and pedestrians were asked to take care for the next 12 weeks as work continued to repair the slump.

Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield said work on the slumped area was intended to start within the next four weeks.

“The process to reinstate unfortunately does take time, as it involves geotechnical investigations, technical designs, applying for emergency road works funding, procurement and resource consent phases.

“The geotech investigation showed that the failure of the wall was due to erosion at the toe of the riverbank following the severe weather event, rather than the footpath guard rail itself."

Mr Hadfield said the repair work would involve a retaining wall which required custom-made poles that took six weeks to construct.

The total work package from traffic management through to construction would be $160,000.

THE cost of a new length of footpath and rail installed in March this year where Riverside Road becomes Stafford Street is growing.

The path was undermined soon after it was installed. In March a new rail was added to a section of the footpath near the Russell Street intersection and the footpath was extended into Stafford Street at a cost of $41,000.

In May the hill under the riverside footpath slumped after severe weather, leaving the footpath hanging on the edge for about 60 metres.

The road was reduced to one lane and drivers and pedestrians were asked to take care for the next 12 weeks as work continued to repair the slump.

Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield said work on the slumped area was intended to start within the next four weeks.

“The process to reinstate unfortunately does take time, as it involves geotechnical investigations, technical designs, applying for emergency road works funding, procurement and resource consent phases.

“The geotech investigation showed that the failure of the wall was due to erosion at the toe of the riverbank following the severe weather event, rather than the footpath guard rail itself."

Mr Hadfield said the repair work would involve a retaining wall which required custom-made poles that took six weeks to construct.

The total work package from traffic management through to construction would be $160,000.

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