MOU option for Tolaga Bay hall

Reynolds Hall Trust and GDC agree to MOU for management and advice

Reynolds Hall Trust and GDC agree to MOU for management and advice

REYNOLDS Hall Trust will retain ownership of the Tolaga Bay community facility but will sign a Memorandum of Understanding with Gisborne District Council for help with management and funding advice. That agreement was reached with council’s community development and services committee this week after the trust previously suggested the council take over ownership because of insurance and potential long-term volunteer issues. Trust representative Bruce Jefferd said they preferred the third option before the committee — that of having a MOU with the council.

“That will work for us.”

The council probably did not want another hall “on their books”, he said. How the council could help the trust with insurance was “limited”. Option 3 was the best way forward, with possible council grant funding, he said.

In establishing a MOU, the trust would receive council support in project management, funding advice, general management and technical knowledge. Mr Jefferd said the trust could also apply to the council for multi-year grants to cover matters such as insurance, repairs and maintenance.

Pat Seymour suggested an extra clause in the recommendation investigating possible council multi-year funding, but that was not supported. Mrs Seymour said upgrading by the trust had transformed the facility, which was well used by the community. Council had created a precedent by granting the Poverty Bay A and P Association multi-year funding ($20,000 for 10 years over the draft 2018-2028 long-term annual plan).

Josh Wharehinga did not support such funding for the trust. The council was working on the community facilities strategy and it would not be appropriate to make an individual adjustment for the trust, he said. Shannon Dowsing supported Mr Wharehinga. Current grant funding was based on short-term sustainability, he said.

Bill Burdett asked what the difference was between the A and P Association and Reynolds Hall Trust. The councillor for Matakaoa-Waiapu then answered his own question. “One is in Gisborne and one is north.” He suggested the full council receive a paper on the issue.

Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said the A and P Association had been getting annual funding that had been formalised as part of a long-term process. It was quite different from the situation with Reynolds Hall Trust.

The original recommendation for Reynolds Hall (option 3) was passed unamended.

REYNOLDS Hall Trust will retain ownership of the Tolaga Bay community facility but will sign a Memorandum of Understanding with Gisborne District Council for help with management and funding advice. That agreement was reached with council’s community development and services committee this week after the trust previously suggested the council take over ownership because of insurance and potential long-term volunteer issues. Trust representative Bruce Jefferd said they preferred the third option before the committee — that of having a MOU with the council.

“That will work for us.”

The council probably did not want another hall “on their books”, he said. How the council could help the trust with insurance was “limited”. Option 3 was the best way forward, with possible council grant funding, he said.

In establishing a MOU, the trust would receive council support in project management, funding advice, general management and technical knowledge. Mr Jefferd said the trust could also apply to the council for multi-year grants to cover matters such as insurance, repairs and maintenance.

Pat Seymour suggested an extra clause in the recommendation investigating possible council multi-year funding, but that was not supported. Mrs Seymour said upgrading by the trust had transformed the facility, which was well used by the community. Council had created a precedent by granting the Poverty Bay A and P Association multi-year funding ($20,000 for 10 years over the draft 2018-2028 long-term annual plan).

Josh Wharehinga did not support such funding for the trust. The council was working on the community facilities strategy and it would not be appropriate to make an individual adjustment for the trust, he said. Shannon Dowsing supported Mr Wharehinga. Current grant funding was based on short-term sustainability, he said.

Bill Burdett asked what the difference was between the A and P Association and Reynolds Hall Trust. The councillor for Matakaoa-Waiapu then answered his own question. “One is in Gisborne and one is north.” He suggested the full council receive a paper on the issue.

Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said the A and P Association had been getting annual funding that had been formalised as part of a long-term process. It was quite different from the situation with Reynolds Hall Trust.

The original recommendation for Reynolds Hall (option 3) was passed unamended.

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