Searching for Dunbar

Descendants of Gisborne soldier looking for relatives of man standing in photo

Descendants of Gisborne soldier looking for relatives of man standing in photo

DO YOU KNOW THIS SOLDIER? Private Lance Hardy, sitting, is pictured with an unknown Gisborne “chum’’ named Dunbar. The family of Mr Hardy are looking for any descendants of Dunbar. Private Hardy was killed in action two months after this photograph was taken. Picture supplied

THE search is on for a Gisborne soldier of World War 1 who is known only by his Christian name of Dunbar. Hawke’s Bay man Michael Hardy is looking for the descendants of the Gisborne man who appears in a photograph and is named in a postcard written by Mr Hardy’s relative, Private Lancelot Wilberforce Whitaker Hardy.

Private Hardy wrote of “a chum of mine from Gisborne” named Dunbar and the two soldiers appear together in a photograph dated May 26, 1917. The soldier of 2nd Battalion, Wellington Infantry Regiment, wrote that the photograph was taken “a few miles from the firing line”.

Private Hardy also wrote of the champion New Zealand racehorse of the era, Desert Gold, who won 19 consecutive races in an Australasian record only broken in recent years by Black Caviar. He was writing to his uncle — Michael Hardy’s grandfather — who owned a half-brother to Desert Gold.

Private Hardy, of Blackburn near Ongaonga in Hawke’s Bay, was killed on July 27, 1917, at the German-held village of La Basseville in Belgium. The 25-year-old was survived by his parents and sister Essie.

Private Hardy left New Zealand on April 3, 1916, as part of the 15th Reinforcements. Michael Hardy told The Herald his relative played for the Dannevirke High School First XV and most of the team were killed in World War 1.

Mr Hardy said he would like to meet any descendants of Dunbar who still live in Gisborne.

THE search is on for a Gisborne soldier of World War 1 who is known only by his Christian name of Dunbar. Hawke’s Bay man Michael Hardy is looking for the descendants of the Gisborne man who appears in a photograph and is named in a postcard written by Mr Hardy’s relative, Private Lancelot Wilberforce Whitaker Hardy.

Private Hardy wrote of “a chum of mine from Gisborne” named Dunbar and the two soldiers appear together in a photograph dated May 26, 1917. The soldier of 2nd Battalion, Wellington Infantry Regiment, wrote that the photograph was taken “a few miles from the firing line”.

Private Hardy also wrote of the champion New Zealand racehorse of the era, Desert Gold, who won 19 consecutive races in an Australasian record only broken in recent years by Black Caviar. He was writing to his uncle — Michael Hardy’s grandfather — who owned a half-brother to Desert Gold.

Private Hardy, of Blackburn near Ongaonga in Hawke’s Bay, was killed on July 27, 1917, at the German-held village of La Basseville in Belgium. The 25-year-old was survived by his parents and sister Essie.

Private Hardy left New Zealand on April 3, 1916, as part of the 15th Reinforcements. Michael Hardy told The Herald his relative played for the Dannevirke High School First XV and most of the team were killed in World War 1.

Mr Hardy said he would like to meet any descendants of Dunbar who still live in Gisborne.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Did Winston Peters and New Zealand First make the right decision?