District Court news

Gisborne Courthouse. File picture by Rebecca Grunwell

Dre Pare-Collins, 19, was sentenced in Gisborne District Court to 70 hours community work for assaulting his mother and wilfully damaging walls in her Housing NZ house.

The court was told Pare-Collins punched his mother twice in the chest and once in the face with a fist after she tried to intervene in an altercation between him and his brothers.

He threw three glass ornaments at an interior wall, damaging it in three places.

Counsel Ann-Jolena Baker said Pare-Collins and his mother were on good terms again. He had a job and was contributing to the household’s expenses.

This was Pare-Collins’ first conviction for violence, Ms Baker said.

Reparation was not sought for the damage.

~

Concerned he might be resorting to the same violence he grew up seeing his father use, a teenager charged with assaulting a female had voluntarily sought help from an appropriate agency, his lawyer said.

Ropata Papuni, 19, pleaded guilty to assaulting a female and a breach of bail. He received nine months supervision and was ordered to do 70 hours community work.

Counsel Amanda Courtney said Papuni was upset by his own behaviour and worried he might be repeating what he remembered his father doing.

Judge Cathcart said Papuni punched a woman twice in the head over a silly incident. He grabbed the front of her shirt near the neck and dragged her round a bedroom. The incident only ceased when his mother pulled him away.

Such offending was epidemic on the East Coast — the court needed to respond sternly.

~

A man might have got away with saying cultivation and possession of cannabis was all for personal use this time . . . but do it again, and police would probably take a different view, Judge Cathcart told him.

Henare Shane Kapa, 30, was sentenced to six months supervision and ordered to do 120 hours community work in relation to 205.9 grams of cannabis and 16 cannabis plants found in his possession.

Judge Cathcart said Kapa’s cultivating enterprise involved equipment that suspiciously bordered on commercial. It was questionable why anyone who had cannabis solely for personal use would need a set of scales, the judge said.

~

FOR his ninth drink-driving offence, Shannon Elroy Lucan Nepe, 38, was sentenced to four and a half months home detention with six months standard and special post-detention conditions.

He was disqualified indefinitely and will be subject to a zero-alcohol licence in future.

The owner of the vehicle he used will be warned it will be confiscated if he uses it to reoffend.

Counsel Amanda Courtney said it was accepted the starting point had to be imprisonment but she urged the judge to convert the sentence to home detention.

The offence involved a moderate reading and was not aggravated by any dangerous driving. Nepe was not disqualified from driving at the time, Ms Courtney said.

He had pleaded guilty early and was making attempts to address his alcohol dependency.

His decision to drive, although a bad one (with a breath-alcohol level of 572), was triggered by an emotional response to being asked to leave a property.

Judge Cathcart said he would step back from imprisonment because he was concerned jailing Nepe would impact too severely on his children and family.

~

Driving with a breath-alcohol reading of 1108 micrograms, a man lost control of his vehicle on Whangara Road.

It crossed the centre line and ended up in a ditch, the court was told.

John Warren Kwak, 50, pleaded guilty to driving while intoxicated for the third or subsequent time, his fifth, and careless use.

For the drink-driving, he received 120 hours community work, six months supervision, and was disqualified from driving for a year and a day.

For careless use, he was fined $300 (court costs $130).

The offence was aggravated by the “incredibly high” reading, Judge Cathcart said.

The consequences for innocent people was enormous and could have been more so had it occurred earlier that night.

While troubling, Kwak’s offending had to be kept in context. His past offending was spread over a long time, the most recent in 2010, others being in 1987 and 1991. In that sense, he was not a recidivist.

Counsel Mana Taumaunu said Kwak intended to apply for a limited licence and had engaged counsel privately — both involving significant costs, which would be an additional penalty.

~

A disqualified and intoxicated driver who crashed into a parked car in Mary Street, has been jailed for nine months but granted leave to apply for home detention.

It was a ninth drink-drive offence for Teri Rolleston, 33, the court was told.

She admitted driving with a breath-alcohol level of 850 micrograms and pleaded guilty to driving while disqualified and careless use.

Judge Cathcart disqualified Rolleston indefinitely and said she would need a zero-alcohol licence before driving again.

Reparation was not sought for damage to the other vehicle. It had been covered by insurance, the court was told.

Summarising the case, Judge Cathcart said that immediately after crashing into the other vehicle, Rolleston reversed up and drove off. The other vehicle owner heard the noise, pursued Rolleston home and phoned police.

Mana Taumaunu said Rolleston, a mother of three, deserved the chance to apply for home detention. She had made efforts to address problems behind her offending. She had found employment — not just one job, but two — and had secured long-term accommodation.

Judge Cathcart noted Rolleston had previously been subjected to almost every kind of sentence including intensive supervision, which she was on at the time of this offending.

A pre-sentence report was not favourable and he commented on her leaving a rehabilitation programme she was directed to attend by the probation service. However, he accepted that in doing so, Rolleston had enrolled in a programme she felt better fitted needs. It was an appropriate one and she had achieved a certificate of completion.

Damien Alexander John Hihi, 31, pleaded guilty to driving with excess breath-alcohol (868mcg) for the third or subsequent time, his third, and driving while disqualified.

He received four months community detention, was indefinitely disqualified and will be subject to a zero-alcohol licence in future.

The owner of the vehicle Hihi used will be warned it will be confiscated if he uses it to reoffend.

Counsel Alistair Clarke sought the community detention sentence, saying it would enable Hihi to continue his employment commitments and maintain financial support payments for his three children.

~

Renaldo Komaru Haere, 50, admitted driving while disqualified for the third or subsequent time and a breach of release conditions.

He was sentenced to 120 hours community work, some of it in lieu of further disqualification.

Applying for the reprieve from the mandatory driving ban, counsel Mark Sceats said Haere was indefinitely disqualified in 2005 and further disqualified for finite periods since. He had done all he could to get himself off the treadmill of repeated disqualified driving. He now had his driver’s licence and work available to him as a driver for a trucking firm.

~

A man admitted burgling a Matthews Road property last October and that he also received property (valued under $500) stolen that month from a Matawai Road property.

Dartelle Morris Rigby, 29, was further remanded in custody for sentence via AV link, along with a co-accused, on December 7.

The matter was referred to the restorative justice process.

~

Beau Robert Ngakapa Hooper, 33, pleaded guilty to a representative charge of injuring a man with intent to injure at Hicks Bay in February.

The Crown offered no evidence on two charges of assault with a blunt instrument.

Hooper was remanded on bail for sentence on January 16. A pre-sentence report will traverse the suitability of an electronically-monitored sentence.

~

Dre Pare-Collins, 19, was sentenced in Gisborne District Court to 70 hours community work for assaulting his mother and wilfully damaging walls in her Housing NZ house.

The court was told Pare-Collins punched his mother twice in the chest and once in the face with a fist after she tried to intervene in an altercation between him and his brothers.

He threw three glass ornaments at an interior wall, damaging it in three places.

Counsel Ann-Jolena Baker said Pare-Collins and his mother were on good terms again. He had a job and was contributing to the household’s expenses.

This was Pare-Collins’ first conviction for violence, Ms Baker said.

Reparation was not sought for the damage.

~

Concerned he might be resorting to the same violence he grew up seeing his father use, a teenager charged with assaulting a female had voluntarily sought help from an appropriate agency, his lawyer said.

Ropata Papuni, 19, pleaded guilty to assaulting a female and a breach of bail. He received nine months supervision and was ordered to do 70 hours community work.

Counsel Amanda Courtney said Papuni was upset by his own behaviour and worried he might be repeating what he remembered his father doing.

Judge Cathcart said Papuni punched a woman twice in the head over a silly incident. He grabbed the front of her shirt near the neck and dragged her round a bedroom. The incident only ceased when his mother pulled him away.

Such offending was epidemic on the East Coast — the court needed to respond sternly.

~

A man might have got away with saying cultivation and possession of cannabis was all for personal use this time . . . but do it again, and police would probably take a different view, Judge Cathcart told him.

Henare Shane Kapa, 30, was sentenced to six months supervision and ordered to do 120 hours community work in relation to 205.9 grams of cannabis and 16 cannabis plants found in his possession.

Judge Cathcart said Kapa’s cultivating enterprise involved equipment that suspiciously bordered on commercial. It was questionable why anyone who had cannabis solely for personal use would need a set of scales, the judge said.

~

FOR his ninth drink-driving offence, Shannon Elroy Lucan Nepe, 38, was sentenced to four and a half months home detention with six months standard and special post-detention conditions.

He was disqualified indefinitely and will be subject to a zero-alcohol licence in future.

The owner of the vehicle he used will be warned it will be confiscated if he uses it to reoffend.

Counsel Amanda Courtney said it was accepted the starting point had to be imprisonment but she urged the judge to convert the sentence to home detention.

The offence involved a moderate reading and was not aggravated by any dangerous driving. Nepe was not disqualified from driving at the time, Ms Courtney said.

He had pleaded guilty early and was making attempts to address his alcohol dependency.

His decision to drive, although a bad one (with a breath-alcohol level of 572), was triggered by an emotional response to being asked to leave a property.

Judge Cathcart said he would step back from imprisonment because he was concerned jailing Nepe would impact too severely on his children and family.

~

Driving with a breath-alcohol reading of 1108 micrograms, a man lost control of his vehicle on Whangara Road.

It crossed the centre line and ended up in a ditch, the court was told.

John Warren Kwak, 50, pleaded guilty to driving while intoxicated for the third or subsequent time, his fifth, and careless use.

For the drink-driving, he received 120 hours community work, six months supervision, and was disqualified from driving for a year and a day.

For careless use, he was fined $300 (court costs $130).

The offence was aggravated by the “incredibly high” reading, Judge Cathcart said.

The consequences for innocent people was enormous and could have been more so had it occurred earlier that night.

While troubling, Kwak’s offending had to be kept in context. His past offending was spread over a long time, the most recent in 2010, others being in 1987 and 1991. In that sense, he was not a recidivist.

Counsel Mana Taumaunu said Kwak intended to apply for a limited licence and had engaged counsel privately — both involving significant costs, which would be an additional penalty.

~

A disqualified and intoxicated driver who crashed into a parked car in Mary Street, has been jailed for nine months but granted leave to apply for home detention.

It was a ninth drink-drive offence for Teri Rolleston, 33, the court was told.

She admitted driving with a breath-alcohol level of 850 micrograms and pleaded guilty to driving while disqualified and careless use.

Judge Cathcart disqualified Rolleston indefinitely and said she would need a zero-alcohol licence before driving again.

Reparation was not sought for damage to the other vehicle. It had been covered by insurance, the court was told.

Summarising the case, Judge Cathcart said that immediately after crashing into the other vehicle, Rolleston reversed up and drove off. The other vehicle owner heard the noise, pursued Rolleston home and phoned police.

Mana Taumaunu said Rolleston, a mother of three, deserved the chance to apply for home detention. She had made efforts to address problems behind her offending. She had found employment — not just one job, but two — and had secured long-term accommodation.

Judge Cathcart noted Rolleston had previously been subjected to almost every kind of sentence including intensive supervision, which she was on at the time of this offending.

A pre-sentence report was not favourable and he commented on her leaving a rehabilitation programme she was directed to attend by the probation service. However, he accepted that in doing so, Rolleston had enrolled in a programme she felt better fitted needs. It was an appropriate one and she had achieved a certificate of completion.

Damien Alexander John Hihi, 31, pleaded guilty to driving with excess breath-alcohol (868mcg) for the third or subsequent time, his third, and driving while disqualified.

He received four months community detention, was indefinitely disqualified and will be subject to a zero-alcohol licence in future.

The owner of the vehicle Hihi used will be warned it will be confiscated if he uses it to reoffend.

Counsel Alistair Clarke sought the community detention sentence, saying it would enable Hihi to continue his employment commitments and maintain financial support payments for his three children.

~

Renaldo Komaru Haere, 50, admitted driving while disqualified for the third or subsequent time and a breach of release conditions.

He was sentenced to 120 hours community work, some of it in lieu of further disqualification.

Applying for the reprieve from the mandatory driving ban, counsel Mark Sceats said Haere was indefinitely disqualified in 2005 and further disqualified for finite periods since. He had done all he could to get himself off the treadmill of repeated disqualified driving. He now had his driver’s licence and work available to him as a driver for a trucking firm.

~

A man admitted burgling a Matthews Road property last October and that he also received property (valued under $500) stolen that month from a Matawai Road property.

Dartelle Morris Rigby, 29, was further remanded in custody for sentence via AV link, along with a co-accused, on December 7.

The matter was referred to the restorative justice process.

~

Beau Robert Ngakapa Hooper, 33, pleaded guilty to a representative charge of injuring a man with intent to injure at Hicks Bay in February.

The Crown offered no evidence on two charges of assault with a blunt instrument.

Hooper was remanded on bail for sentence on January 16. A pre-sentence report will traverse the suitability of an electronically-monitored sentence.

~

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