Tauawhi No Violence Longboard Classic on Saturday

A CHARITABLE longboard competition aims to put an end to family violence here, one wave at a time.

The Tauawhi No Violence Longboard Classic on Saturday supports the Tauawhi Charitable Trust, which supports the Tauawhi Men’s Centre to help raise awareness about and prevent family violence.

Centre organiser Tim Marshall said the competition was in its third year and gathering momentum.

“It always has a really positive atmosphere, with everyone enjoying the whanau-friendly day and embracing the kaupapa of a violence-free Tairawhiti.

“The competition is not ultra-competitive. It is open to all levels, but in the past we have had former longboard national champions like Daniel Procter and Kelly Ryan, and people coming from around the country.

“Even if people are not surfing, they can come down for an entertaining day and to support the kaupapa.”

All funds raised will go to the trust’s work in preventing family violence and supporting the centre from a community perspective.

“It is also about raising awareness of preventing family violence and encouraging men to take a stand against violence to women, and build and maintain respectful relationships,” Mr Marshall said.

“Family violence is a big issue in Tairawhiti. We have the highest rate of police reports per head of population, and when we know only about 20 percent is reported, the scale is huge.

“Events like this are about the community connecting and highlighting the need to change attitudes towards family violence.

“It does not have to be police solving the problem but often those closer to home who can support people in a positive way.”

The idea for the competition came from Ian Procter and Moananui Longboardriders Club.

Mr Procter was involved in supporting Tauawhi’s Dad and Me programme. He and a few other surfers travelled to Hawaii and Byron Bay for similar charity surf events and realised there was nothing like that here.

They set up the No Violence classic to coincide with the month of domestic violence awareness and White Ribbon Day on November 25.

With support from Moananui Longboardriders Club, the Tauawhi No Violence Longboard Classic starts at 7.30am on Saturday at Makorori Beach.

It is open to all ages and costs $40 for open and older surfers, and $20 for those under 16. The speedos/bikini event is free.

All profits go to Tauawhi Charitable Trust to help support the work of Tauawhi Men’s Centre.

The major spot prize is a longboard, and other spot prizes will be awarded for best Hawaiian shirt and wildest hat.

Registration is at Charcoal Chicken, Gladstone Road, on Friday from 6pm to 9pm.

For more information, contact Tim Marshall on 027-5586-362, or check out the Tauawhi or Moananui Longboardriders Club Facebook pages.

A CHARITABLE longboard competition aims to put an end to family violence here, one wave at a time.

The Tauawhi No Violence Longboard Classic on Saturday supports the Tauawhi Charitable Trust, which supports the Tauawhi Men’s Centre to help raise awareness about and prevent family violence.

Centre organiser Tim Marshall said the competition was in its third year and gathering momentum.

“It always has a really positive atmosphere, with everyone enjoying the whanau-friendly day and embracing the kaupapa of a violence-free Tairawhiti.

“The competition is not ultra-competitive. It is open to all levels, but in the past we have had former longboard national champions like Daniel Procter and Kelly Ryan, and people coming from around the country.

“Even if people are not surfing, they can come down for an entertaining day and to support the kaupapa.”

All funds raised will go to the trust’s work in preventing family violence and supporting the centre from a community perspective.

“It is also about raising awareness of preventing family violence and encouraging men to take a stand against violence to women, and build and maintain respectful relationships,” Mr Marshall said.

“Family violence is a big issue in Tairawhiti. We have the highest rate of police reports per head of population, and when we know only about 20 percent is reported, the scale is huge.

“Events like this are about the community connecting and highlighting the need to change attitudes towards family violence.

“It does not have to be police solving the problem but often those closer to home who can support people in a positive way.”

The idea for the competition came from Ian Procter and Moananui Longboardriders Club.

Mr Procter was involved in supporting Tauawhi’s Dad and Me programme. He and a few other surfers travelled to Hawaii and Byron Bay for similar charity surf events and realised there was nothing like that here.

They set up the No Violence classic to coincide with the month of domestic violence awareness and White Ribbon Day on November 25.

With support from Moananui Longboardriders Club, the Tauawhi No Violence Longboard Classic starts at 7.30am on Saturday at Makorori Beach.

It is open to all ages and costs $40 for open and older surfers, and $20 for those under 16. The speedos/bikini event is free.

All profits go to Tauawhi Charitable Trust to help support the work of Tauawhi Men’s Centre.

The major spot prize is a longboard, and other spot prizes will be awarded for best Hawaiian shirt and wildest hat.

Registration is at Charcoal Chicken, Gladstone Road, on Friday from 6pm to 9pm.

For more information, contact Tim Marshall on 027-5586-362, or check out the Tauawhi or Moananui Longboardriders Club Facebook pages.

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