Champion of the chess board

STRATEGIC THINKING: Camden Champion says the secret to his success in winning Te Tairawhiti Intermediate Schools Chess Tournament yesterday was thinking hard about his next move. It paid off for the Nuhaka School student yesterday when he won six out of six games and scored the highest out of the 39 players taking part. Picture by Liam Clayton

CAMDEN Champion lived up to his name when he won Te Tairawhiti Intermediate Schools Chess Tournament yesterday.

The Nuhaka School Year 7 student won all six of his games at the tournament held at Gisborne Intermediate School.

Camden said he was very happy and that the secret to his success was looking ahead, “thinking hard about my next move”.

“I really like playing war and strategic games, and chess is a strategic war game that I can play wherever and whenever I want. It’s really fun."

His dad and brothers taught him how to play the game and he was grateful to oldest brother Harry for teaching him new chess moves and strategies.

Second place at the tournament was shared by four players: Flynn Hall and Te Kuramea Karere from Gisborne Intermediate, Grace Kuil from Nuhaka School, and Manaia Puha from Tolaga Bay Area School.

Gisborne Intermediate and Nuhaka shared first place for best overall team.

The tournament comprised 39 players from six schools: Gis Int, Nuhaka School, Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui, TKKM o Mangatuna, Tolaga Bay Area School and Te Waha o Rerekohu from Te Araroa.

It was run by Gisborne’s Eastern Knights Chess Club and was a round-robin format.

Players were awarded one point for a win and half a point for a draw.

A computer-generated draw matched players of similar strength as the tournament progressed to get the ultimate winner.

The tournament was sponsored by Pultron, Tairawhiti REAP (Rural Education Achievement Programme) and Turanga Health and all place-getters received a chess set.

Nuhaka School recently came out on top at the Hawke’s Bay junior chess championship.

That and this latest success underlines the school’s strong chess culture, with many of its students playing from a young age.

CAMDEN Champion lived up to his name when he won Te Tairawhiti Intermediate Schools Chess Tournament yesterday.

The Nuhaka School Year 7 student won all six of his games at the tournament held at Gisborne Intermediate School.

Camden said he was very happy and that the secret to his success was looking ahead, “thinking hard about my next move”.

“I really like playing war and strategic games, and chess is a strategic war game that I can play wherever and whenever I want. It’s really fun."

His dad and brothers taught him how to play the game and he was grateful to oldest brother Harry for teaching him new chess moves and strategies.

Second place at the tournament was shared by four players: Flynn Hall and Te Kuramea Karere from Gisborne Intermediate, Grace Kuil from Nuhaka School, and Manaia Puha from Tolaga Bay Area School.

Gisborne Intermediate and Nuhaka shared first place for best overall team.

The tournament comprised 39 players from six schools: Gis Int, Nuhaka School, Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui, TKKM o Mangatuna, Tolaga Bay Area School and Te Waha o Rerekohu from Te Araroa.

It was run by Gisborne’s Eastern Knights Chess Club and was a round-robin format.

Players were awarded one point for a win and half a point for a draw.

A computer-generated draw matched players of similar strength as the tournament progressed to get the ultimate winner.

The tournament was sponsored by Pultron, Tairawhiti REAP (Rural Education Achievement Programme) and Turanga Health and all place-getters received a chess set.

Nuhaka School recently came out on top at the Hawke’s Bay junior chess championship.

That and this latest success underlines the school’s strong chess culture, with many of its students playing from a young age.

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