Campion makes pre-loved clothes fashionable

WORKING THE RUNWAY: Student Ngaia Gudgeon wears a light denim coloured playsuit on the runway, followed by budding young male models. Pictures by Rebecca Grunwell
PE teacher Jonathan McDonald takes selfies while modelling board shorts (with price tag still attached) and a patterned shirt.

A GROUP of Campion College students put on a fashion show with a difference on Monday. All the clothes were second hand from the Salvation Army Store.

A select group of teachers and students strutted their stuff on the runway, encouraged by an appreciative audience in the school gym.

Libby Briant and Edan Wilson compered the show, introducing each model and talking about the runway outfits. Liam Spring and Zach Moroney, who sourced the clothing for the show from the Salvation Army Store, were also part of the organising team.

From board shorts with shirts to smart dresses for work and play, they all came with a bargain price tag.

The average cost of an outfit was under $15.

Quality of clothes

Organiser Libby Briant said she was surprised by the quality of the clothes available at the Salvation Army Store.

“All you have to do is look and you can find some really good items for very affordable prices.”

“With labels such as Countryroad, Cotton On and Calvin Klein, it shows that second- hand shopping can make financial and fashion sense.

“It was great to be able to support the Salvation Army and to raise awareness for this amazing association that does wonders for our community.”

The fashion show was part of a Heroes class, a combination of religious education and social studies for Year 9 and 10 students.

The class is about making students heroes of their own lives by doing something that will help others.

“The students have all planned and carried out their own social action promoting the special character of our school,” said teacher Aimee Ostler.

“Through the study of social justice, social studies concepts, Catholic social teachings, and virtues, students develop an understanding of the actions people take to address human rights and social justice issues.”

There was a koha entry and all the clothes were available to buy at the end of the show, with proceeds going to the Salvation Army. Pamphlets were also distributed that outline the services the Salvation Army provides to the community.

A GROUP of Campion College students put on a fashion show with a difference on Monday. All the clothes were second hand from the Salvation Army Store.

A select group of teachers and students strutted their stuff on the runway, encouraged by an appreciative audience in the school gym.

Libby Briant and Edan Wilson compered the show, introducing each model and talking about the runway outfits. Liam Spring and Zach Moroney, who sourced the clothing for the show from the Salvation Army Store, were also part of the organising team.

From board shorts with shirts to smart dresses for work and play, they all came with a bargain price tag.

The average cost of an outfit was under $15.

Quality of clothes

Organiser Libby Briant said she was surprised by the quality of the clothes available at the Salvation Army Store.

“All you have to do is look and you can find some really good items for very affordable prices.”

“With labels such as Countryroad, Cotton On and Calvin Klein, it shows that second- hand shopping can make financial and fashion sense.

“It was great to be able to support the Salvation Army and to raise awareness for this amazing association that does wonders for our community.”

The fashion show was part of a Heroes class, a combination of religious education and social studies for Year 9 and 10 students.

The class is about making students heroes of their own lives by doing something that will help others.

“The students have all planned and carried out their own social action promoting the special character of our school,” said teacher Aimee Ostler.

“Through the study of social justice, social studies concepts, Catholic social teachings, and virtues, students develop an understanding of the actions people take to address human rights and social justice issues.”

There was a koha entry and all the clothes were available to buy at the end of the show, with proceeds going to the Salvation Army. Pamphlets were also distributed that outline the services the Salvation Army provides to the community.

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